Coastal Peoples Fine Art Gallery
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Gallery Locations:

Yaletown
1024 Mainland Street
Vancouver BC
Canada V6B 2T4

P: 604.685.9298
T: 1.888.686.9298
F: 604.684.9248
E: coastalpeoples@telus.net
 
Hours
Mon - Sat: 10:00am - 6:00pm
Sun + Hol: 11:00am - 6:00pm
After hours: Open by appointment only

Closed: Christmas Day; Boxing Day; New Year's Day

Near Skytrain station - Yaletown/Roundhouse
Gastown
312 Water Street
Vancouver BC
Canada V6B 1B6

P: 604.684.9222
E: coastalpeoples@telus.net
 
Hours
Mon - Sat: 10:00am - 6:00pm
Sun + Hol: 11:00am - 6:00pm
After hours: Open by appointment only

Closed: Christmas Day; Boxing Day; New Year's Day

Near Skytrain station - Waterfront

Gallery policy both locations:
Exchanges or store credit only
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In Memory: Ken Humpherville

In Memory: Ken Humpherville

August 12th, 2014 An extraordinary talent, Ken Humpherville passed away on Saturday, August 9th as he was reaching the pinnacle of his career.

Exactly one year ago, Ken was participating in the annual Santa Fe Indian Art Market in California where he won...

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August 12th, 2014 An extraordinary talent, Ken Humpherville passed away on Saturday, August 9th as he was reaching the pinnacle of his career.

Exactly one year ago, Ken was participating in the annual Santa Fe Indian Art Market in California where he won two ribbons - First Place in Diverse Arts for his mask and Second Place for his bentwood box.

Born in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan as a Metis Cree in 1947, his parents moved to British Columbia to settle in Prince Rupert while he was a young child.  Ken became immersed in the Tsimshian culture while he began his life-long love of wood carving, particularly his specialty of steam-bending cedar to create elaborately detailed chests.

Continuously the perfectionist, he dove into each project with enthusiasm and energy to create some of the finest artworks to come from this region.

Ken's life and career were cut short far too early and he will be greatly missed.

We welcome you to view more details on Ken's biography and his works in the Gallery's collection here.

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In Memory: Hilary Stewart (Author)

In Memory: Hilary Stewart (Author)

June 17, 2014 On June 5th, author and archaeological legend Hilary Stewart passed away at the age of 90.

Hilary was born in 1924 and lived in St Lucia, West Indies until she moved to...

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June 17, 2014 On June 5th, author and archaeological legend Hilary Stewart passed away at the age of 90.

Hilary was born in 1924 and lived in St Lucia, West Indies until she moved to England with her family at age nine. Early on, she was taken with her first experience of Canadian First Nations culture following a lecture by "Grey Owl".

After graduating from her studies at St. Martin's School of Art in London, she joined her brother Peter in Canada.  She emersed herself into the life of the Canadian wilderness.

During her years as a writer when she volunteered articles and illustrations for the archaeological Society of British Columbia, she became an early advocate of experimental archaeology.  She subsequently wrote and illustrated books on First Nations' artifacts, which became best sellers.

In 2005, she won the CAA's Pendergast Award for contributions by an avocational archaeologist.

Over the years, she published many books and her most well-known include "Cedar" (1984), "Looking at Indian Art" (1992), and "Looking at Totem Poles " (1993).

She spent many years on book tours, lectured and did demonstrations for various educational organizations, museums, art galleries, and became a regular hands-on instructor at Strathcona Park Lodge. She even curated three exhibitions for the UBC Museum of Anthropology on the subject of her books.

She felt "everything outdoors was fascinating", and her voice and beautiful illustrations in her work are a living testament to her complete devotion and dedication to life on the West coast.

 

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In Memory: Lucy Tasseor Tutsweetok

In Memory: Lucy Tasseor Tutsweetok

April 20, 2012 Earlier this month, Arviat artist Lucy Tasseor passed away during a time in which the Art Gallery of Ontario had a featured exhibition of her works on display, and she will always be remembered for her distinctive minimalistic carvings.

In 1934, she was born in...

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April 20, 2012 Earlier this month, Arviat artist Lucy Tasseor passed away during a time in which the Art Gallery of Ontario had a featured exhibition of her works on display, and she will always be remembered for her distinctive minimalistic carvings.

In 1934, she was born in Manitoba and over time eventually moved to Arviat where her early carvings of animals were replaced by figurative work.  Her themes were primarily of mother and child as well as family and community.  

While her greatest influence was her grandfather's stories, she allowed the material to dictate its natural shape as the inspiration for its final form .

Her work has been exhibited internationally and throughout Canada in major collections.

The AGO's exhibition in Toronto continues through to June 3, 2012.

Her remarkable individuality as an artist will be missed.

We welcome you to view her work and biography through our Inuit and/or Artist Biographies link.

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Kesu' Exhibition at MOA

Kesu' Exhibition at MOA

March 17 - September 3, 2012, The Audain Gallery, MOA.

Kesu': The Art and Life of Doug Cranmer honours a man who embodies 'indigenous modern' before the term was invented, but preferred the descriptor 'whittler' or 'doodler' to 'Kwakwaka'wakw artist'.

Northwest Coast Kwakwaka’wakw art is renowned for its flamboyant, energetic, and colorful carving and painting. Among the leading practitioners was... more ...

March 17 - September 3, 2012, The Audain Gallery, MOA.

Kesu': The Art and Life of Doug Cranmer honours a man who embodies 'indigenous modern' before the term was invented, but preferred the descriptor 'whittler' or 'doodler' to 'Kwakwaka'wakw artist'.

Northwest Coast Kwakwaka’wakw art is renowned for its flamboyant, energetic, and colorful carving and painting. Among the leading practitioners was Doug Cranmer (1927-2006), whose style was understated, elegant, and fresh, and whose work quickly found an international following in the 1960s. He was an early player in the global commercial art market, and one of the first Native artists in British Columbia to own his own gallery. A long-time teacher, he inspired generations of young Native artists in his home village of Alert Bay and beyond.

The exhibit shows a wide range of Doug’s artistic works in two and three dimensions in wood and paint, from totem poles, a canoe, masks, bentwood boxes, bowls, and prints, to his important “Abstract series” of paintings on mahogany plywood. Works and words by his students are also included in the exhibit, which is organized as a series of overlapping modules that reflect different aspects of the artist’s life and work.

Dr. Jennifer Kramer, MOA Curator, Pacific Northwest, and Assistant Professor of Anthropology at UBC, curated the exhibit, and authored the accompanying book, which is available in the MOA Shop.

Excepts taken from MOA.

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In Memory: Derek Wilson

In Memory: Derek Wilson

September 13, 2011 Recently the Hereditary Chief of the Haisla Nation, Derek Wilson, passed away leaving behind a legacy of more ...

September 11, 2011 Recently the Hereditary Chief of the Haisla Nation, Derek Wilson, passed away leaving behind a legacy of incredible art works.

Born in 1950 in Kemano, Derek learned of his heritage and Haisla dialect from this elders and created his first cedar carving at 8 years old under the tutelage of his uncle Henry Robertson.  Decades later as he progressed his design skills as a self-taught artist, he transitioned into jewelry carving which became a lifelong devotion.

Featured on this web site are several jewelry pieces, which are currently available beginning here .

His work has been exhibited at the Museum of Anthropology, the Vancouver Centennial Museum and a 1967 museum collection in England. In 1981, one of his gold rings was gifted to Queen Elizabeth, and in 2000 he travelled to Sweden with his brother Barry and uncle Henry to raise a commissioned pole as as replacement for an existing G'psgoalux Haisla Totem [c.1900].

His memorial took place on Friday, September 9th at the Vancouver Friendship Centre.

We'll remember Derek as a gifted artist but, more than that, he was a gentle soul who will be dearly missed.

To view more of his works and biography, we welcome you to view these through our Jewelry and Artist Biographies links.

 

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Site Updated August 27 2014 21:31:11 EST