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Lyle Wilson: Solo Exhibition 2016


November 5th - December 18th, 2016

Haislakala: Spoken from the Heart

“Haislakala is the name of our endangered traditional language. First Nation languages, including Haislakala, were discouraged once Europeans started settling British Columbia. A policy of assimilation was instituted for Natives that survived earlier epidemics, and so the English language came to dominate life, trade, school and politics.  My ancestors accepted that the Haislakala language was...

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November 5th - December 18th, 2016

Haislakala: Spoken from the Heart

“Haislakala is the name of our endangered traditional language. First Nation languages, including Haislakala, were discouraged once Europeans started settling British Columbia. A policy of assimilation was instituted for Natives that survived earlier epidemics, and so the English language came to dominate life, trade, school and politics.  My ancestors accepted that the Haislakala language was an impediment to the succeeding Haisla generations, so they never bothered to teach it to us, and we never demanded to learn it. Like many of my generation, I grew up hearing the elders speaking Haislakala, so we can recognize but not understand more than a few words.  I have decided to consistently pursue learning Haislakala and include it in my life and artwork.”  - Lyle Wilson

Lyle Wilson’s complete devotion to the evolution of Haisla art, language and culture has earned him many accolades including his time spent as resident artist at the Museum of Anthropology.

When presented with the idea of a solo jewelry exhibition, Lyle wavered for a moment, then quickly and firmly agreed this would be a momentous milestone. Given his years of devotion to this vital art form, he understood that the time to embrace it was now and he was ready.  Given his tremendous scope as an artist, he soon realized that showcasing only jewelry would be limiting.  His mixed-media work of combining unconventional materials to create a harmonious balance between figures visibly defines his artistic repertoire.  Only a master artist with decades under his belt could possess the foresight to envision which specific materials complement and complete an art piece.

“Exploring one’s roots brings a healthy appreciation of one’s place in the scheme of things. The Pacific Northwest Coast (PNC) formline has undergone changes over the passage of time. What I wanted to do was to pay homage to that earlier, cleaner, straightforward, massive look of PNC art because it captures the sense of that era’s time. I learned from what work they left behind and so it impacts the work I do today.” – Lyle Wilson

The common thread tying Lyle's magnificent collection together is quite simply the Haisla stories and dialect that have survived throughout the generations - first orally and now solidified in written form to be preserved for the next millennia. The tremendous importance of communicating through visual art to keep a culture alive is key to its endurance.  This element has been the driving force for Lyle's solo exhibition, which highlights more than simply beauty and extends to a tangible sensitivity in design, depth, detail and dialect. These four components give vitality to the artworks Lyle has crafted where no detail has remained untouched and even the titles are honourably represented in the Haisla dialect.

We are privileged to present this exhibition dedicated to Lyle Wilson’s determination to reach for the stars in every aspect of his creative process. His art brings out many emotions, but primarily gives voice to the preservation of language, culture, and fortitued for continued growth.

November 5th - December 16, 2016

“Haislakala is the name of our endangered traditional language. First Nation languages, including Haislakala, were discouraged once Europeans started settling British Columbia. A policy of assimilation was instituted for Natives that survived earlier epidemics, and so the English language came to dominate life, trade, school and politics.  My ancestors accepted that the Haislakala language was an impediment to the succeeding Haisla generations, so they never bothered to teach it to us, and we never demanded to learn it. Like many of my generation, I grew up hearing the elders speaking Haislakala, so we can recognize but not understand more than a few words.  I have decided to consistently pursue learning Haislakala and include it in my life and artwork.”  - Lyle Wilson

Lyle Wilson’s complete devotion to the evolution of Haisla art, language and culture has earned him many accolades including his time spent as resident artist at the Museum of Anthropology.

When presented with the idea of a solo jewelry exhibition, Lyle wavered for a moment, then quickly and firmly agreed this would be a momentous milestone. Given his years of devotion to this vital art form, he understood that the time to embrace it was now and he was ready.  Given his tremendous scope as an artist, he soon realized that showcasing only jewelry would be limiting.  His mixed-media work of combining unconventional materials to create a harmonious balance between figures visibly defines his artistic repertoire.  Only a master artist with decades under his belt could possess the foresight to envision which specific materials complement and complete an art piece.

“Exploring one’s roots brings a healthy appreciation of one’s place in the scheme of things. The Pacific Northwest Coast (PNC) formline has undergone changes over the passage of time. What I wanted to do was to pay homage to that earlier, cleaner, straightforward, massive look of PNC art because it captures the sense of that era’s time. I learned from what work they left behind and so it impacts the work I do today.” – Lyle Wilson

The common thread tying Lyle's magnificent collection together is quite simply the Haisla stories and dialect that have survived throughout the generations - first orally and now solidified in written form to be preserved for the next millennia. The tremendous importance of communicating through visual art to keep a culture alive is key to its endurance.  This element has been the driving force for Lyle's solo exhibition, which highlights more than simply beauty and extends to a tangible sensitivity in design, depth, detail and dialect. These four components give vitality to the artworks Lyle has crafted where no detail has remained untouched and even the titles are honourably represented in the Haisla dialect.

We are privileged to present this exhibition dedicated to Lyle Wilson’s determination to reach for the stars in every aspect of his creative process. His art brings out many emotions, but primarily gives voice to the preservation of language, culture, and fortitued for continued growth.

To view more of the artist’s works in our gallery collection apart from this solo exhibition – please visit our home page and search by Lyle Wilson's name.
 

 

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