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ENGAGE WITH US

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EXPLORE THE COLLECTION

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ENRICH YOUR MIND

NEW ARRIVALS

Capture the Spirit & Artistry of First Nations Culture

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JEWELRY

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COLLECTION

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CURATOR'S CHOICE

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EXHIBITIONS

FEATURED ARTWORKS

  • Hawk Moon Pendant

    Rick Adkins

    $9,600.00 CAD

    22K Gold, Abalone shell
    Cast, Edition of 12

  • Sun Hawk Mask

    Norman Tait

    Price upon request

    Norman Tait with Lucinda Turner

    Alder wood, Copper, Cedar rope, Horse hair, Operculum shells, Acrylic paint, Leather
    19 x 12 x 7.5″ (incl. hair)
    10.5 x 9 x 7″ (excluding hair)

  • Spirits of Our Time

    Rande Cook

    $300.00 CAD

    Serigraph, Edition of 200

    Unframed

  • Raven & Killerwhale Engagement Set

    Carmen Goertzen

    $2,600.00 CAD

    18K White Gold, 35 point Emerald, Engraved
    Width: 3/8″
    Size: 5

  • Salish Welcoming – Blue [Framed]

    Joe Wilson

    $370.00 CAD

    Serigraph, Edition of 200

    2006

    Framed

    “This welcoming figure represents a human with two Thunderbirds on each side.  The concept of the design originates from two different spindle whorls, one from where I come from, (Cowichan), and one from the Vancouver area which had two Thunderbirds.  The spindle whorls were used in post-contact era to spin mountain goat wool which our people wove into beautiful blankets to clothe ourselves. “Symbolically, the Thunderbird was considered a protector of the people and one of the most powerful spirit beings of the supernatural realm.  Our people searched for these different powers through physical and mental deprivation from food, water and human contact, spending many days in the mountains. “Usually at the age of “maturity,” searching for a spirit helper or power through visions was very common.  Once accomplished, they retreated home to a ceremonial welcoming, to be blessed by the villages’ shaman or medicine man.  Happy to have found their place in the community knowing that if they ask their new found helper, they can become better at whatever it is that they do, whether it be hunting, fishing, etc. for the men, to basket or wool weaving for the women.  The human figure in this picture can also be seen as saying “thank you,” or “hay chqa,” with hands raised and palms facing toward you.  This is a warm way to welcome your visitors in our Salish culture.”

     

  • River Bound [Framed]

    Susan Point

    $3,400.00 CAD

    Serigraph, Edition of 20

    2006

     

    Framed

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