Patrick Leach

Patrick Leach is from the St’át’imc First Nation Territory. Raised in T’ít’q’et community near Lillooet B.C. he is of the P’egpig’7lha (Frog) clan.

Patrick’s began with photography as his first induction in the art world.  Having left his home and family, Patrick moved to Courtney BC where he received his photography certificate from North Island College. While there, Patrick learned the theory and practice in capturing critical elements of light, timing, weather, emotion and people. Combining this with pure heart and soul he is able to capture the full life and spirit of the moment on camera. His pictures tell a story that draws a viewer in as though they themselves had been in the moment when the photo was taken.

His art has caught the attention of magazines such as Red Skin and Say where some of his photos were later debuted. He has also had the honour of photographing local artist and brother, George Leach, leading to the timeless shot that now graces the back of George’s first CD.

Once college was completed, Patrick was not yet ready to go out on his own and still felt something was missing.  For the next 9 years Patrick returned to his career with BC Forests working with the Seton Lake Unit Crew.  During that time, he focused on nature photography from the perspective and eyes of an on-scene fire fighter.

His introduction to pottery happened in 2008 when he took one of the biggest leaps of faith in his life.  Patrick began to work under the mentorship of Matthew Jacob, a well known BC based aboriginal photographer. During this time of dramatic change and transition, he began working on his second artistic love: pottery – a medium not found in Northwest Coast art.

Under the close eye of Erdman Tuemp, a local pottery master, Patrick has learned how to combine the processes and styles of both Erdman and renowned Kwakwaka’wakw artist Steve Smith.  Drawing from his creative mind and steady hand Patrick places the final touches by carefully carving landscapes, geometrical designs and scenes from ancient traditional rock paintings and basket weaving. Each piece is a one of a kind creation.

All of Patrick Leach’s pottery is handmade (porcelain) then hand-carved.  Some of the pottery is carved on the inside and several have glazes (two firing for the glaze on the inside) and all pots have a clear glaze on the outside.

As an emerging artist, Patrick Leach’s new earthly style is quickly becoming recognized for its beauty, fine finishing, and intricate designs.  These individualistic creations will easily become much sought-after as his career continues to progress.

  • Basket Weave Bowl

    Patrick Leach

    $80.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    The St’át’imc of the Interior Salish Nation were renowned for their basketry. Coiled baskets were crafted from peeled and split Red Cedar roots. These baskets were sewn so tightly that they could hold water, and with the addition of water to the absorbent material, the roots would expand and create an even stronger seal. Most Salish baskets were decorated in complex geometric designs and it is these motifs that Leach replicates on his ceramics.

  • Turtle Bowl

    Patrick Leach

    $100.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    On Patrick Leach’s pottery, the final touches are carefully hand-carved landscapes, geometric designs, and scenes borrowed from ancient rock paintings called pictographs. These designs are either replicas of, or inspired by, the red ochre pictographs found in Stein Valley near Leach’s childhood home. Leach frequently employs contrasting bands of red ochre glaze to represent earth, blue for sky, yellow for sunrise or orange for sunset.

  • Basket Weave Bowl

    Patrick Leach

    $180.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    The St’át’imc of the Interior Salish Nation were renowned for their basketry. Coiled baskets were crafted from peeled and split Red Cedar roots. These baskets were sewn so tightly that they could hold water, and with the addition of water to the absorbent material, the roots would expand and create an even stronger seal. Most Salish baskets were decorated in complex geometric designs and it is these motifs that Leach replicates on his ceramics.

  • Basket Weave Plate

    Patrick Leach

    $60.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    The St’át’imc of the Interior Salish Nation were renowned for their basketry. Coiled baskets were crafted from peeled and split Red Cedar roots. These baskets were sewn so tightly that they could hold water, and with the addition of water to the absorbent material, the roots would expand and create an even stronger seal. Most Salish baskets were decorated in complex geometric designs and it is these motifs that Leach replicates on his ceramics.

  • River & Salmon Vase

    Patrick Leach

    $80.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    The Fraser River flows up the valley near Lillooet and was a primary source of sustenance for the St’át’imc people, as several salmon runs ventured up the river annually. Leach frequently depicts the representation of the river, two parallel wavy lines, in conjunction with either the salmon or dip net pictographs.

    The St’át’imc have some of the best salmon fishing and wind drying areas in the Fraser Canyon area . Salmon runs are frequent in the Fraser River, with spring salmon running in April and again in late summer as well as a string of sockeye salmon runs starting in June. Patrick emphasizes the importance of salmon to the St’át’imc people.

  • Basket Weave Bowl

    Patrick Leach

    $60.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    The St’át’imc of the Interior Salish Nation were renowned for their basketry. Coiled baskets were crafted from peeled and split Red Cedar roots. These baskets were sewn so tightly that they could hold water, and with the addition of water to the absorbent material, the roots would expand and create an even stronger seal. Most Salish baskets were decorated in complex geometric designs and it is these motifs that Leach replicates on his ceramics.

  • Eagle, Sun, Moon & Stars Bowl

    Patrick Leach

    $100.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    Eagle is often viewed as a symbol of leadership, peace, friendship, and intelligence. The pictograph depicts a linear eagle, with feathers adorning its outstretched wings and talons on both feet.

    Patrick displays these symbols concurrently, and says that they are used to represent day and night. These depictions refer to the timelessness and endurance of both his art and the art of his Nation collectively.

  • River & Salmon Vase

    Patrick Leach

    $80.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    The Fraser River flows up the valley near Lillooet and was a primary source of sustenance for the St’át’imc people, as several salmon runs ventured up the river annually. Leach frequently depicts the representation of the river, two parallel wavy lines, in conjunction with either the salmon or dip net pictographs.

    The St’át’imc have some of the best salmon fishing and wind drying areas in the Fraser Canyon area . Salmon runs are frequent in the Fraser River, with spring salmon running in April and again in late summer as well as a string of sockeye salmon runs starting in June. Patrick emphasizes the importance of salmon to the St’át’imc people.

  • Fishing Scene Bowl

    Patrick Leach

    $125.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    This pictograph of shows a man holding a dip net. Dip netting was a fishing technique used by the St’át’imc to catch considerable quantities of salmon in the Fraser River. Standing on a land outcrop or a wooden platform, fishermen would lower the net into the river narrows, where the currents are strong. The mouth of the net would then be closed, trapping the fish that had swam inside, and hauled out of the river.

    Typically Leach includes the representations of the salmon and the river alongside the fisherman to depict a full scene.

  • Hummingbird Bowl

    Patrick Leach

    $150.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    This beautiful, tiny bird is common to the Northwest Coast of Canada and believed to represent not only beauty and love, but it also brings good luck and spiritual healing to anyone who comes into contact with it. Hummingbirds are associated with love, beauty, intelligence, and healing. Patrick often portrays the hummingbird surrounded by a flowering tree.

  • Eagle & Mountains Bowl

    Patrick Leach

    $80.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    Patrick was raised in the community of T’ít’q’et, near Lillooet, BC in St’át’imc Nation Territory. The depiction of mountains is an homage to Lillooet and Leach’s upbringing. Leach often depicts dual mountains with birds flying above the peaks.

  • Eagle & Mountains Bowl

    Patrick Leach

    $150.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    Patrick was raised in the community of T’ít’q’et, near Lillooet, BC in St’át’imc Nation Territory. The depiction of mountains is an homage to Lillooet and Leach’s upbringing. Leach often depicts dual mountains with birds flying above the peaks.

  • Fishing Scene Bowl

    Patrick Leach

    $125.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    This pictograph of shows a man holding a dip net. Dip netting was a fishing technique used by the St’át’imc to catch considerable quantities of salmon in the Fraser River. Standing on a land outcrop or a wooden platform, fishermen would lower the net into the river narrows, where the currents are strong. The mouth of the net would then be closed, trapping the fish that had swam inside, and hauled out of the river.

    Typically Leach includes the representations of the salmon and the river alongside the fisherman to depict a full scene.

  • Owl Protecting the Animals Bowl

    Patrick Leach

    $100.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    This pictograph is one directly borrowed from the Stein Valley Nlaka’pamux Heritage Park, near Lillooet. Several ancient pictographs dot the river valley and this one is particular is a direct replica of a pictograph found on the banks of the Stein River. The outstretched wings of the owl protectively cover the deer, perhaps meant to represent all fauna, flanking either side of it.

  • Basket Weave Bowl

    Patrick Leach

    $100.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    The St’át’imc of the Interior Salish Nation were renowned for their basketry. Coiled baskets were crafted from peeled and split Red Cedar roots. These baskets were sewn so tightly that they could hold water, and with the addition of water to the absorbent material, the roots would expand and create an even stronger seal. Most Salish baskets were decorated in complex geometric designs and it is these motifs that Leach replicates on his ceramics.

  • Owl Protecting the Animals Bowl

    Patrick Leach

    $80.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    This pictograph is one directly borrowed from the Stein Valley Nlaka’pamux Heritage Park, near Lillooet. Several ancient pictographs dot the river valley and this one is particular is a direct replica of a pictograph found on the banks of the Stein River. The outstretched wings of the owl protectively cover the deer, perhaps meant to represent all fauna, flanking either side of it.

  • Hummingbird Vase

    Patrick Leach

    $500.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    This beautiful, tiny bird is common to the Northwest Coast of Canada and believed to represent not only beauty and love, but it also brings good luck and spiritual healing to anyone who comes into contact with it. Hummingbirds are associated with love, beauty, intelligence, and healing. Patrick often portrays the hummingbird surrounded by a flowering tree.

  • Hummingbird Bowl

    Patrick Leach

    $450.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    This beautiful, tiny bird is common to the Northwest Coast of Canada and believed to represent not only beauty and love, but it also brings good luck and spiritual healing to anyone who comes into contact with it. Hummingbirds are associated with love, beauty, intelligence, and healing. Patrick often portrays the hummingbird surrounded by a flowering tree.

  • Fishing Scene Vase

    Patrick Leach

    $300.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    This pictograph of shows a man holding a dip net. Dip netting was a fishing technique used by the St’át’imc to catch considerable quantities of salmon in the Fraser River. Standing on a land outcrop or a wooden platform, fishermen would lower the net into the river narrows, where the currents are strong. The mouth of the net would then be closed, trapping the fish that had swam inside, and hauled out of the river.

    Typically Leach includes the representations of the salmon and the river alongside the fisherman to depict a full scene.

  • Basket Weave Plate

    Patrick Leach

    $80.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    The St’át’imc of the Interior Salish Nation were renowned for their basketry. Coiled baskets were crafted from peeled and split Red Cedar roots. These baskets were sewn so tightly that they could hold water, and with the addition of water to the absorbent material, the roots would expand and create an even stronger seal. Most Salish baskets were decorated in complex geometric designs and it is these motifs that Leach replicates on his ceramics.

  • River, Salmon & Basket Weave Bowl

    Patrick Leach

    $100.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    The St’át’imc of the Interior Salish Nation were renowned for their basketry. Coiled baskets were crafted from peeled and split Red Cedar roots. These baskets were sewn so tightly that they could hold water, and with the addition of water to the absorbent material, the roots would expand and create an even stronger seal. Most Salish baskets were decorated in complex geometric designs and it is these motifs that Leach replicates on his ceramics.

    The Fraser River flows up the valley near Lillooet and was a primary source of sustenance for the St’át’imc people, as several salmon runs ventured up the river annually. Leach frequently depicts the representation of the river, two parallel wavy lines, in conjunction with either the salmon or dip net pictographs.

    The St’át’imc have some of the best salmon fishing and wind drying areas in the Fraser Canyon area . Salmon runs are frequent in the Fraser River, with spring salmon running in April and again in late summer as well as a string of sockeye salmon runs starting in June. Patrick emphasizes the importance of salmon to the St’át’imc people.

  • Fishing Scene Bowl

    Patrick Leach

    $150.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    This pictograph of shows a man holding a dip net. Dip netting was a fishing technique used by the St’át’imc to catch considerable quantities of salmon in the Fraser River. Standing on a land outcrop or a wooden platform, fishermen would lower the net into the river narrows, where the currents are strong. The mouth of the net would then be closed, trapping the fish that had swam inside, and hauled out of the river.

    Typically Leach includes the representations of the salmon and the river alongside the fisherman to depict a full scene.

  • Hummingbird Bowl

    Patrick Leach

    $150.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    This beautiful, tiny bird is common to the Northwest Coast of Canada and believed to represent not only beauty and love, but it also brings good luck and spiritual healing to anyone who comes into contact with it. Hummingbirds are associated with love, beauty, intelligence, and healing. Patrick often portrays the hummingbird surrounded by a
    flowering tree.

  • Basket Weave Bowl

    Patrick Leach

    $150.00 CAD

    Porcelain, Engraved with Interior Glaze

    The St’át’imc of the Interior Salish Nation were renowned for their basketry. Coiled baskets were crafted from peeled and split Red Cedar roots. These baskets were sewn so tightly that they could hold water, and with the addition of water to the absorbent material, the roots would expand and create an even stronger seal. Most Salish baskets were decorated in complex geometric designs and it is these motifs that Leach replicates on his ceramics.