• Cod Lure

    Simon Charlie

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Twine, Acrylic paint

  • Where the Ocean Connects to the Sky Housepost

    Susan Point

    Price upon request

    Glass, etched and sandblasted, Gypsum rock

    Red Cedar wood base, Yellow Cedar wood, Acrylic paint

    Edition of 5

    Exclusive to Coastal Peoples Fine Arts Gallery

    Susan Point’s monumental glass housepost, Where the Ocean Connects to the Sky, reveals the connection between all living creatures – both the physical and spiritual which ties into the core of existence.

    The ‘thread of life’ represented by the ‘cedar rope’ in the centre lies at the heart of this design, linking the surrounding Killerwhales, Salmon, Eagles and Ravens. The ocean is illustrated by the Killerwhales which feed upon the Salmon. The Eagles and Ravens illustrate the sky.

    Killerwhales and humans are believed to be closely related. They symbolize long life, and it is thought that great Chiefs transform into Killerwhales when deceased.  The Eagle is a symbol of power, and Eagle down represents peace and friendship. Its alter ego, the Raven, is considered the hero, the trickster, transformer and creator.  Salmon are a central part of life as a main sustenance of both humans and creatures.

    Susan Point pays homage to First Nation mythology and ideology. This uniquely designed housepost illuminates how tradition can be re-interpreted into a modern day context, as can life lessons associated with stories and legends.  Point’s contemporized and beautifully designed work is a testament to her artistry and First Nation’s tradition and culture

  • Coast Salish Housepost

    Susan Point

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Copper, Acrylic paint

    10.5ft x 4ft x 4 ft (including base)

    Own a piece of history…this Salish Housepost was carved during the 2010 Olympic Games in full public view at Susan Point’s temporary satellite studio outside the Vancouver Art Gallery.  The cedar wood used originates from a reclaimed fallen tree from the Stanley Park storm in 2009.

  • Raven Ladle

    R. 7Lewin

    Price upon request

    Yellow Cedar wood, Acrylic paint

    2014

    Spoons and ladles were traditionally made from either cedar wood or the horn of a mountain sheep, and their handles were carved with family crest images. Historically, these exquisitely sculptured objects were primarily created by people in Northern Nations, and were highly sought after by other nations. During potlatches [festive gatherings], cedar ladles decorated with the hosting family’s crests were used to serve food, while the elaborately carved mountain sheep spoons were distributed as gifts among the many guests.

    Today, spoon and ladle productions are based on these traditional objects and are meant to be both objects of function and display. In addition to traditional mediums such as cedar wood, goat or mountain sheep horn, many modern-day spoons and ladles are constructed of gold, silver and pewter.

  • Halibut Hook

    Cicero August

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Bone, String, Waxed Cord, Acrylic paint

  • Elements of the Earth, Water (Artist Proof)

    Joe Wilson

    $60.00 CAD

    Serigraph, Artist Proof Edition of 18

    2007

    Unframed

    (For inquiries on custom framing, please contact the gallery)


    “This series was designed as a portrayal of the universal elements in symbolic form, translated into Coast Salish design particular to the Coast Salish territory. Each piece was created specifically to represent the most common example of the element in Coast Salish lands.

    Fire is depicted as the Sun, which shines on the land. Wate is depicted as the west coast icon, the Killerwhale. Air is depicted as the legendary creature, Thunderbird. Land is depicted in the pairing of the Eagle and the Salmon.

    For the water element the most common and well-known creature of the sea in this territory is the witty Killerwhale, shown here with a smile and a blowhole, which sings the songs of the Killerwhale. The Killerwhale is much esteemed for its song and just the sight of it brings excitement and enthusiasm.” -Joe Wilson

  • Salmon Ring

    Dylan Thomas

    $130.00 CAD

    Sterling silver, Engraved
    Tapered
    Width: 1/2″
    Size: 10.5

  • Two Salmon

    lessLIE Sam

    $150.00 CAD

    Serigraph, Edition of 150

    2007

    Unframed

    (For inquiries on custom framing, please contact the gallery)


    “Some of my work, when simply depicting nature and animals, is a visual tribute to the greatness of nature and animals. This design is a tribute to salmon. On a formal level, the middle of the design — the eccentric circle and the negative ovals above and below the trigons, have a minor northern Northwest Coast influence, yet they are rendered in a style which is distinctly Coast Salish. Concentric circles are design elements of Coast Salish art, but in the case of this design, they are eccentric circles. Concentric ovals are design elements of the Coast Salish art, but in the case of this design, they are simply negative ovals flanking a negative trigon. Many northern Northwest Coast designs utilize negative cirlces, ovals, and ovoids to fill in large positive spaces. How many influences a contemporary Coast Salish artist can accept from Haida art without succumbing to a Haida-centric perspective is a matter of cultrual conFUSION.”

    –lessLIE


  • Life & Light – Grey & Yellow

    Joe Wilson

    $150.00 CAD

    Serigraph, Edition of 200

    2009

    Unframed

    (For inquiries on custom framing, please contact the gallery)

  • Salmon Wrap Ring

    Dylan Thomas

    $200.00 CAD

    Sterling silver, Copper, Engraved
    Width: 3/4″
    Size: 7

  • Five Ravens

    Dylan Thomas

    $200.00 CAD

    Serigraph, Edition of 125

    2019

    Unframed

    (For inquiries on custom framing, please contact the gallery)

  • Quwut Sun

    lessLIE Sam

    $200.00 CAD

    Serigraph, Edition of 100

    2005

    Unframed

    (For inquiries on custom framing, please contact the gallery)


    “This contemporary Coast Salish sun design is an attempt to mediate between the Hul’qumi’num language (the language of the Cowichan Tribes) and English. There have been various anglecized spellings of this Hul’qumi’num toponym (place name), such as “Cowichan,” “Khowutzun,” and the currently accepted “Quwutsun.” This Hul’qumi’num term has been simplified and misinterpreted as meaning “The Warm Land,” when it should be more correctly interpreted as meaning “warmed by the sun,” or “basking in the sun with your back turned to the sun.”

    The four eclipsed suns surrounding the central sun symbolize the darkness of ignorance blocking Daylight, a powerful source of truth.”

    –lessLIE


  • Khowutzun Legend (Artist Proof)

    Joe Wilson

    $225.00 CAD

    Serigraph, Artist’s Proof Edition of 25

    1995

    Unframed

    (For inquiries on custom framing, please contact the gallery)

  • Sun of Hummingbirds

    lessLIE Sam

    $250.00 CAD

    Serigraph, Edition of 100

    2006

    Unframed

    (For inquiries on custom framing, please contact the gallery)


    “This rectangular Coast Salish design depicts the sun flanked by four hummingbirds. The round split u-forms at the ends of the design suggest red flower petals. Rufous Hummingbirds, a species of hummingbird that migrates to Coast Salish territory in the spring, are drawn to red colours, sometimes mistaking anything red for flowers from which they can feed on nectar. As a contemporary Coast Salish artist, I have always been fascinated by hummingbirds because of their beautiful appearance, small size, and unique way of flying. Whenever I hEAR hummingbirds swooping down around wooded areas, I am reminded that spring and warm weather have arrived.”

    –lessLIE


  • Pro Creation

    lessLIE Sam

    $250.00 CAD

    Serigraph, Edition of 100

    2007

    Unframed

    (For inquiries on custom framing, please contact the gallery)


    “This contemporary Coast Salish design, titled “Pro Creation”, through the act of creativity,is a celebration of the act of procreation. In the design, two salmon heads are depicted, the negative crescentric space simultaneously defining their mouths, as well as defining each other’s lower jaw. This simple visual punning represents interconnectedness through procreation. This simple visual punning also represents the beginnings of the offspring of the two salmon. In some of philosophical musings, I have often wondered which act is great, creation or procreation? I came to the conclusion that procreation is great than creation, since creation, as a human culture, woudl not exist without procreation. I also felt that the lIFe of one human being is much greater than the body of work of any artist. Recently though, I have felt that creatively creates culture, and makes the procreation of many generations possible. So I now see both creation and procreation as both being great acts of humankind.

    On a personal leve, althought I am not really “pro-choice” or “pro-life”, my myOTHER , when she was a sixteen year old girl with me, was considering abortion. With love for her, I am thankful that she gave birth to me. If she never procreated me, the creativity of my lIFe would not exisit.”

    — lessLIE