View
  • Untitled (1991)

    Isaac Bignell

    CA$2,100.00

    Acrylic paint on Acid-free paper

    1991

    Unframed

    (For inquiries on custom framing, please contact the gallery)

  • Beaver & Eagle Fish Bowl

    Derek J. White

    CA$8,000.00

    Sterling Silver; Repousse, Engraved

    Derek White’s extraordinary Beaver & Eagle Fish Bowl, created in the traditional Haida form and utilizing the ancient technique of repousse to add dimension, demonstrates his articulate master carving and artistry skills. Containers such as bowls were traditionally created out of Cedar or Alder wood and utilized in daily life. The chosen medium of silver serves as a contemporary progression of this ancient art form while illustrating the intricate foundational links which combine cultural heritage with the arts.

  • Quwut Sun

    lessLIE

    SOLD

    Serigraph, Edition of 100

    2005

    Unframed

    (For inquiries on custom framing, please contact the gallery)


    “This contemporary Coast Salish sun design is an attempt to mediate between the Hul’qumi’num language (the language of the Cowichan Tribes) and English. There have been various anglecized spellings of this Hul’qumi’num toponym (place name), such as “Cowichan,” “Khowutzun,” and the currently accepted “Quwutsun.” This Hul’qumi’num term has been simplified and misinterpreted as meaning “The Warm Land,” when it should be more correctly interpreted as meaning “warmed by the sun,” or “basking in the sun with your back turned to the sun.”

    The four eclipsed suns surrounding the central sun symbolize the darkness of ignorance blocking Daylight, a powerful source of truth.”

    –lessLIE


  • Welcome Figure Mask

    Joe David

    CA$6,000.00

    Red Cedar wood, Human hair, Acrylic paint

    This Welcome Figure portrait mask, based on a Nuu chah nulth mask from the 1850’s, would be danced during a ceremonial welcome song which belongs to the David family of the Tla-O-Qui-Aht clan. Smoked elk hide has been rigged to the back of the piece to hold it securely in place when being danced.

  • Orca

    Chester (Chaz) Patrick

    CA$980.00

    Exclusive to Coastal Peoples Fine Arts Gallery

    Glass; Etched and sandblasted (Glass thickness 12mm)

    Maple wood base

    Every Household and every clan possessed its own history and traditions in the form of myths and legends. Often describing how an individual had met a supernatural being, in animal form, who had given ownership of certain privileges. These privileges are a highly important part of First Nations life and are retained by particular family groups through their laws of inheritance. Privileges gave an individual status in the community and were more highly valued than any material possession.

    In reality there were rights, such as the right to use a figure on a house post, wear a mask or to perform a dance at a ceremony. Very typical of these legends was the tale of Natcitlaneh, who was abandoned on an island by his brothers-in-law, who were jealous of his prowess as a hunter. He was rescued by the sea lions and taken to their village in a cave, where in gratitude for his healing their Chief, gave him supernatural powers which enabled him to carve eight wooden Killerwhales. These came to life when they were placed in the sea and avenged him by killing his brothers-in-law. As a mark of respect, Natcitlaneh built a house and named it Killerwhale House. According to legend the ancestors visited the house, located at the bottom of the ocean and obtained the right to use the Killerwhale as a crest. The Killerwhale was said to have originated from a single great white wolf that leaped into the sea and transformed itself into a Killerwhale, or Orca. That is why they have the white markings on their sides, travel in packs and are such skilled hunters. The Orca is considered to be the ocean manifestation of the wolf and the two animals are considered to be directly related.

    Another beautiful legend tells that long ago Orca was one color, black and she lived in the water like all fish. Then she fell in love with Osprey and he with her. The Orca wanted to know so badly what it felt like to fly so she leapt farther and farther out of the water to be close to her love and Osprey spent more and more time close to the water to be near his love. Love has a way of making itself shown and expressed, and when their child was born, she was black like Orca, but with a white belly and head like the Osprey. The Orca has a song so beautiful that all creation is said to stop and listen to the Orca and that to be splashed by the Orca is to ensure great luck and happiness.

    Chaz’s beautifully sculptured glass Killerwhales pay tribute to First Nation culture, oral history and traditions. These are testament to an ideology in which we are all interconnected and part of the greater whole- each related and affecting the other.

  • Haida Eagle Pole

    Geoff Greene

    CA$3,600.00

    Glass, Etched and Sandblasted, 20K Gold Leaf, Edition of 57

    Glass thickness 12mm

    Exclusive to Coastal Peoples Fine Arts Gallery – currently available by custom order only – please ask us for details

    Geoff Greene’s Haida Eagle Totem pays tribute to an important symbol and crest figure to the Haida nation. Created in the contemporary medium of glass, the Haida Eagle Totem celebrates traditional design within a luminous setting that speaks to the evolution of the classic Haida form.

    The Eagle is respected for its intelligence and power as well as its vision both figurative and literal; it claims both honor and a high stature. The Eagle Clan is traditionally the most prominent family and the Eagle Chief the most powerful chief. Although revered as a powerful hunter, the Eagle’s feathers are considered sacred. Traditionally, Shamans believed that Eagle feathers possessed healing powers and thus used them in various ceremonial and ritual contexts; today these feathers are still strewn to welcome an honored guest.

    Geoff Greene’s beautifully etched and sandblasted Haida Eagle Totem employs the magnificent translucent nature of glass in its finish along with the accent of gold leaf to provide additional depth and interest within this unique work. Masterly created, this piece blends ancient animal symbolism within a stylized contemporary form and demonstrates how many artists are setting themselves apart through their unique concepts.

    Available with Stainless steel or Natural Maple wood base.

  • Beaver Swimming

    Norman Tait

    CA$1,400.00

    Serigraph, Edition of 95

    Unframed

    (For inquiries on custom framing, please contact the gallery)

    The Beaver appears in Northwest mythology and is a family crest in many regions throughout the Northwest Coast. According to legend, the first Beaver was a woman, whose husband frequently went on long hunting and fishing trips. In his absence, his lonely wife took solace swimming, enlarging her pond with a dam and building her own water dwelling. Eventually, she transformed into a Beaver and their children were Beaver People, founding the Beaver lineage.

    In mythology, they are often associated with the powerful undersea supernatural beings and the magic Giant Beaver can cause natural disaster with one slap of its wide, strong tail. Characterisically, the Beaver is known to keep to himself and cares little for the activities of the humans, except when they are directly affected. Thus, they often give wise advice so it is important to listen when they do decide to speak.

  • Tranquility

    Andy Everson

    CA$200.00

    Giclee, Edition of 50

    2001

    Unframed

    (For inquiries on custom framing, please contact the gallery)

  • Eagle Frontlet

    Charles Peter Heit

    CA$8,200.00

    Birch wood, Abalone, Ivory

    For more details on shipping Ivory outside of Canada, please click here and then click open the Shipping section and scroll down to read more on Shipping Restrictions.

    A frontlet is a forehead mask attached to a woven headpiece.  It is worn by chiefs and high-ranking individuals as a display of crests and status.  Frontlets are often decorated with materials that are symbols of wealth and power: abalone shell, operculum shell, sea lion whiskers, feathers and/or ermine pelts.

    The intelligent Eagle symbolizes status, power, peace and friendship.

  • Bill Reid and Beyond: Expanding on Modern Native Art

    Karen Dufffek and Charlotte Townsend-Gault

    CA$45.00

    Academically charged, this book offers a wide-ranging and thought-provoking collection of art and cultural scholars reappraisals regarding Bill Reid’s career and compelling artwork. Aware of political, economic and social events, this book examines and adds to the ongoing debate about aboriginality and modern art.

    Published in 2005

    Hardcover