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  • Where Air Meets Water (Eagle & Killerwhale) Plate

    Corrine Hunt

    $65.00 CAD

    Recycled Glass

    Plexi-glass display stand not included

    The concept for this design is based upon the physical depiction of air meeting water – a droplet of water which creates a swirl as the air affects its surface. The whorl-shape created by this abstract notion has produced the forms of an Eagle, on the left side of the design, and a Killerwhale; it’s body elusively curving around the right side. Corrine has continued to play with the whirlpool concept by introducing echoing shapes and forms that reflect across the surface of the material and invite the viewer to explore the “water’s” surface.

  • $50 Gift Card

    Coastal Peoples Gallery

    $50.00 CAD

    For details on our Gift Cards policy – please click here to review on the FAQ page.

  • Hecate Strait Scarf – State I

    Susan Point

    $420.00 CAD

    100% Silk; Limited Edition of 100

    Exclusively available through Coastal Peoples Gallery

    “Hecate Strait is a wide but shallow strait between Haida Gwaii (formerly known as the Queen Charlotte Islands) and the mainland of British Columbia.  Hecate Strait, because it is so shallow, is especially susceptible to violent storms and weather; therefore, has always been revered by the Northwest Coast First Nations Peoples.

    The shallow waters make it an abundant place for marine life, especially for spotting Orcas and Humpback Whales breaching.

    In this scarf design, I’ve illustrated the turbulent waters, abundance of Orcas, and Salmon.

    Orcas are great guardians of the ocean, with Seals as slaves and Dolphins as warriors.  Orcas are closely related to humans; I was told many legends as a child of the whale people and their villages beneath the sea.

    Salmon are a symbol of abundance, wealth and prosperity because Salmon are the primary food source for the people of the Northwest Coast.  It is also symbolic of dependability and renewal representing the provider of life.  Salmon in pairs are good luck.”

    – Susan Point, 2018

  • $500 Gift Card

    Coastal Peoples Gallery

    $500.00 CAD

    For details on our Gift Cards policy – please click here to review on the FAQ page.

  • Finding A Voice: The Art of Norman Tait

    Vickie Jensen

    $85.00 CAD

    This catalogue was published by Nisga’a Museum in conjunction with the exhibition Finding A Voice: The Art of Norman Tait held at Nisga’a Museum from May 30 to August 29, 2015 and at the West Vancouver Museum from October 14 to December 5, 2015.

    Norman Tait (b. 1941) has been devoted to art since childhood. Imbued with a deep connection to his Nisga’a heritage and family, Tait has utilized his artistic gifts and transcended the quotidian to create the extraordinary. Self-taught, this self-critical and highly engaged artist has, over the past five decades, researched and explored his Nation’s rich cultural heritage and forged a voice for himself that speaks through his myriad of sculptural and two dimensional works. This voice is driven by a passion to reinvent traditional narratives within a contemporary context and provide ways in which to connect his ancestral heritage to today’s fast paced and changing world.

    Authors:
    Karen Duffek is the Curator of Contemporary Visual Arts & Pacific Northwest at the UBC Museum of Anthropology (MOA). Her research focus lies both in the history of Northwest Coast Aboriginal collections―including connecting and documenting historical objects, particularly those made and used during the period of potlatch prohibition, with descendants and originating community members―and in the relationship of contemporary art to cultural practice. Among her many exhibitions are Projections: The Painted Art of Henry Speck, Udzi’stalis (co-curated with Marcia Crosby, 2012) and a collaboration with artist Peter Morin in Peter Morin’s Museum (2011), both at MOA’s Satellite Gallery; Border Zones: New Art across Cultures (MOA, 2010); Robert Davidson: The Abstract Edge (MOA, with tour to the National Gallery of Canada, 2044-2007); and with Tom Hill, the now historical Beyond History (Vancouver Art Gallery, 1989). Her publications include the webzine borderzones.ca (2010) and the books Bill Reid and Beyond: Expanding on Modern Native Art (co-edited with Charlotte Townsent-Gault, 2004), Robert Davidson: The Abstract Edge (2004), and the Transforming Image: Painted Arts of Northwest Coast First Nations (co-authored with Bill McLennan, 2000).

    Vickie Jensen is a Vancouver-based photographer and author who began photographing Norman Tait’s work in the mid 1980s. She wrote her first book, Where the People Gather: Bringing a Log to Life, (reprinted in paperback as Totem Pole Carving), based on three months of intense collaboration as Tait and his crew carved a 42-foot doorway pole. “We talked, discussed the photos I was taking, shared the meals I cooked―it was a transforming experience in my life. And getting to know Norman’s family was an unexpected bonus. “ Jensen also wrote about this pole in the children’s book Carving a Totem Pole and has featured Tait’s work in a third book, The Totem Poles of Stanley Park, expanded and re-titled in 2015 as Totem Poles and the Lure of Stanley Park. As of 2005 her extensive text and photo documentation of Norman Tait’s career is part of the Jensen-Powell Fonds housed in the Museum of Anthropology Archives.

    Darrin Martens is currently the Chief Curator of the Audain Art Museum. Prior to this position he served as the Director of the Nisga’a Museum and Director/curator of Burnaby Art Gallery. Martens has a Master’s degree in Art History from the University of British Columbia with a focus on Critical Curatorial Studies. He is also a fellow of Claremont Graduate University’s J. Paul Getty Foundation’s Museum Leadership Institute. Prior to his studies at UBC he received a Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Arts degrees from the University of Regina. Marten’s passion lies in exploring Canadian art history and in particular artists of First Nations heritage. He has curated over 50 exhibitions and contributed to over 30 publications.

    Shirley Morven, whose Nisga’a name is Angaye’e, was born in Gitlaxt’aamiks, British Columbia. She is one of the members of the Gitwilnnaak’il’ Wolf clans from that ancient community. She is currently the Chairperson for Nisga’a Lisims Government’s Council of Elders and where she is one of the four national officers. She is also charged with the oversight of Collections and Exhibitions on the Nisga’a Museum Advisory Committee. She has served in several other capacities over her lifetime, always with a focus on formal and traditional Nisga’a practices. She has functioned as District Principal for Nisga’a Language and Culture for School District # 92. In addition she was chairperson for the Nisga’a Valley Health Board for 1 ½ terms just at the turn of the century, and on the New Aiyansh Band Council for two terms prior to the Nisga’a attaining their autonomy.

    Published in 2015

    Hardcover

  • Susan Point: Works On Paper

    Gary Wyatt

    $29.95 CAD

    A gorgeous collection of prints by one of the Northwest’s leading artists

    Over the past thirty years Susan Point has become the preeminent Coast Salish artist of her generation, exploring many different modern and traditional themes in a wide variety of media. She has received major public commissions in her home province of British Columbia as well as throughout the Northwest coast, the traditional territory of her people, creating extraordinary monumental sculptures that grace important public buildings. Her glass sculptures are collected around the world.

    This is the first book devoted exclusively to her works on paper. Over the past thirty years Point has been an innovator in printmaking, adapting traditional Coast Salish themes to modern art techniques, translating the heritage of her culture to the wider world while creating a body of work that appeals to art collectors from around the globe. Her synthesis of contemporary and traditional styles has resulted in a formidable artistic accomplishment. This beautifully designed volume collects 160 of her prints together for the first time and is sure to inspire and amaze those who see it.

    Published in 2014

    Softcover

  • Khowutzun Legend (Artist Proof)

    Joe Wilson

    $225.00 CAD

    Serigraph, Artist’s Proof Edition of 25

    1995

    Unframed

    (For inquiries on custom framing, please contact the gallery)

  • The Way Home: David Neel

    David Neel

    $32.95 CAD

    David Neel was an infant when his father, a traditional Kwakiutl artist, returned to the ancestors, triggering a series of events that would separate David from his homeland and its rich cultural traditions for twenty-five years. When he saw a potlatch mask carved by his great-great-grandfather in a museum in Fort Worth, Texas, the encounter inspired the young photographer to rekindle a childhood dream to follow in the footsteps of his father.

    Drawing on memories, legends, and his own art and portrait photography, David Neel recounts his struggle to reconnect with his culture after decades of separation and a childhood marred by trauma and abuse.  He returned to the Pacific Coast in 1987, where he apprenticed with master carvers from his father’s village. The art of his ancestors and the teaching of the people he met helped to make up for the last years and fuelled his creativity.  His career as a multi-media artist also gave him the opportunity to meet and photograph leading artists, knowledgeable elders, and prominent people from around the world.  In time he was a recognized artists, with his artwork presented in more than forty solo and sixty group exhibitions.

    The Way Home is an uplifting tale that affirms the healing power of returning home.  It is also a testament to the strength of the human spirit to overcome great obstacles, and to the power and endurance of Indigenous culture and art.

    Softcover

  • People Among the People: The Public Art of Susan Point

    Robert D. Watt

    $50.00 CAD

    Susan Point’s unique artworks have been credited with almost single-handedly reviving the traditional Coast Salish art style. Once nearly lost to the effect of colonization, the crescents, wedges, and human and animal forms characteristic of traditional Coast Salish art can now been seen around the world – reinvigorated with modern materials and techniques – in her serigraphs and public art installations, as well as the works of a new generation of artists that she’s inspired.

    While the images and symbolism of Point’s work are often informed by surviving traditional Salish works and the Traditional Knowledge of her Musqueam family and Elders, she has developed a unique and contemporary style that continues to evolve.

    People Among People beautifully displays the breadth and depth of her public art, from cast bronze faces in Whistler to massive carved cedar portals in Stanley Park to moulded polymer murals in Seattle.

    Through interviews and archival access, Robert D. Watt gathers the story of each piece, often in Point’s own words, to illustrate the vital role she has played in revealing the re-establishing the “Salish footprint” in the Pacific Northwest.  An artist’s statement by Point and an essay by Dr. Michael Kew complete this portrait of a profoundly moving collection of artworks.

    Hardcover

  • Hummingbird Ring

    John Lancaster

    $50.00 CAD

    Sterling silver, Engraved
    Domed
    Width: 1/4″
    Size: 4.75, 5, 7

  • $250 Gift Card

    Coastal Peoples Gallery

    $250.00 CAD

    For details on our Gift Cards policy – please click here to review on the FAQ page.

  • $100 Gift Card

    Coastal Peoples Gallery

    $100.00 CAD

    For details on our Gift Cards policy – please click here to review on the FAQ page.

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