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  • Nanasimgit Panel Pipe

    Christian White

    Price upon request

    Argillite, Catlinite, Abalone shell, Mother of Pearl

    This ornately detailed panel pipe inlayed with catlanite, abalone shell and mother of pearl tells the ancient story of Nanasimgit.

    The man or Nanasimgit is depicted at the bottom of the pipe holding skils to represent his stature. It shows the numerous potlatches he has held. The following story is a shortened version as told by the artist, Christian White:

    One day, the man’s wife was washing sea otter skins near the ocean, when a Killerwhale arose from the surface. It coaxed her into the water and carried her seaward while her husband watched in disbelief. Without hesitation, he quickly decided to follow them until the Killerwhale dove near a two-headed kelp, which prevented him from going any further. He was feeling quite distraught as he returned back to the village but by then he had decided to seek the help of his uncle, the Frog.

    The Frog offered him advice on how he could get his wife back and suggested that he take specific objects with him for his journey. He brought spruce root twine, a gimlet and medicine, placing them in his canoe. But, before he embarked on his journey, he was urged to undergo a fast in order to cleanse his body, which involved various rituals.

    Once the fast was completed, the man embarked on his quest until he came across the kelp he had encountered before. He tied his canoe to the kelp along with his possessions and climbed down beneath the surface to find himself in another world. He followed a path where he encountered three blind women that resembled Geese. He used his medicine to cure two of the women while the third one chose not to accept the medicine. The cured women vowed to repay him for his deed. As he proceeded onward, the man came across two slaves, from the Killerwhale clan, chopping wood. As they proceeded to chop the wood, the head of their axe fell off and they began to cry knowing the consequences they would face from the Chief. The man stopped to assist them and in return they directed him to his wife’s dwelling. The slaves warned the man of the watchmen pole that stood in front of the longhouse protecting the inhabitants. The watchmen had the ability to scent out and watch out for intruders.

    While he proceeded further on his path and thought about how to divert the watchmen, the man encountered a Heron repairing a canoe without success. The man stopped to offer him his gimlet to successfully repair the canoe. In return for his generosity, the Heron helped conceal the man under his wing blanket from the Black Whale guards and the watchmen. He successfully entered the longhouse to happily find his wife. At this point, the watchmen discovered the man taking his wife back with him, but were unable to stop him.

    When the man arrived back with his wife to his village he felt a different connection with her, as though she was not herself. At night, he would keep her in a bentwood box, but one morning when he awoke, to his surprise she escaped. She left to be with her Killerwhale family and fully transformed into a Killerwhale. This was the last he saw of her.

    4.75 x 10.25 x 1.25″ (without base)

    8 x 12 x 5.25″ (with base)

  • Sun Hawk Mask

    Norman Tait

    Price upon request

    Norman Tait with Lucinda Turner

    Alder wood, Copper, Cedar rope, Horse hair, Operculum shells, Acrylic paint, Leather

    Norman Tait’s exceptional Sun Hawk Mask stems from his father’s clan, the Tlingit Nation ancestry, and primarily represents one of his father’s family crest figures. While this exquisite maks depicts elements of a human face, the additional features, such as the beak, allude to its supernatural connection. Constructed from Alder wood, the wood’s unique grain is a strong element within the design and is used to exemplify the mask’s delicate human-like structure.  Furthermore, the addition of acrylic paint and the stark horsehair locks add life to this Humanized Supernatural-being.

    Featured in Finding A Voice: The Art of Norman Tait

    10.5 x 9 x 7″ (excluding hair)

  • Hawk Moon Pendant

    Rick Adkins

    Price upon request

    22K Yellow Gold, Abalone shell, Cast
    Edition of 12
    2007

  • Raven Transforming Into Human Pendant

    Philip Janze

    Price upon request

    22K Yellow Gold, Repousse, Chased, Engraved
    Domed

  • Ceremonial Talking Stick

    Dr. Richard Hunt

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Abalone shell (over 150 individual inlaid pieces), Acrylic paint

    More images available upon request.

    69 x 12 x 11″ (including base)

     

  • Eagle, Dogfish, Beaver & Frog Box

    Derek J. White

    Price upon request

    Sterling Silver, Argillite, Abalone shell, Mastodon Ivory, Repousse, Engraved

    This piece opens to reveal an inner box with relief engraving that echos the outer lid.

    Traditionally, boxes were considered prized possessions and customarily used to store wealth or special ceremonial objects such as masks, rattles, clothing and adornments. People often gave names to these beautiful ornate boxes, told stories about their histories and treated them as family heirlooms. However, non-decorated boxes acted as instruments of life – from storing less precious articles, to food and later used for mortuary purposes. In Haida mythology, a stack of boxes contained the essence from which Raven created the world.

    Eagle, Dogfish, Beaver and Frog Box retains its traditional elements through conception and imagery. Derek exhibits his mastery in his precision of line and perfect symmetry of the formline of this treasure. The gently angled lid with Abalone inlay, as well as the engraved and incised elements on the box is suggestive of the prototypic bent cornered wooden boxes and chests.

    The box contains not only depictions of four important crest animals, but connects to past traditions in which a box held more than the material object, it also linked people to their heritage, lineage and each other.

     

    For more details on shipping Ivory outside of Canada, please click here and then click open the Shipping section and scroll down to read more on Shipping Restrictions.

  • Killerwhale & Moon Bracelet

    Don Yeomans

    Price upon request

    18K Yellow Gold, Engraved, Repoussé, Chased
    Cut-Out Design Feature, Tapered

  • Coast Salish Housepost

    Susan Point

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Copper, Acrylic paint

    10.5ft x 4ft x 4 ft (including base)

    Own a piece of history…this Salish Housepost was carved during the 2010 Olympic Games in full public view at Susan Point’s temporary satellite studio outside the Vancouver Art Gallery.  The cedar wood used originates from a reclaimed fallen tree from the Stanley Park storm in 2009.

  • Where the Ocean Connects to the Sky Housepost

    Susan Point

    Price upon request

    Glass, etched and sandblasted, Gypsum rock

    Red Cedar wood base, Yellow Cedar wood, Acrylic paint

    Edition of 5

    Exclusive to Coastal Peoples Fine Arts Gallery

    Susan Point’s monumental glass housepost, Where the Ocean Connects to the Sky, reveals the connection between all living creatures – both the physical and spiritual which ties into the core of existence.

    The ‘thread of life’ represented by the ‘cedar rope’ in the centre lies at the heart of this design, linking the surrounding Killerwhales, Salmon, Eagles and Ravens. The ocean is illustrated by the Killerwhales which feed upon the Salmon. The Eagles and Ravens illustrate the sky.

    Killerwhales and humans are believed to be closely related. They symbolize long life, and it is thought that great Chiefs transform into Killerwhales when deceased.  The Eagle is a symbol of power, and Eagle down represents peace and friendship. Its alter ego, the Raven, is considered the hero, the trickster, transformer and creator.  Salmon are a central part of life as a main sustenance of both humans and creatures.

    Susan Point pays homage to First Nation mythology and ideology. This uniquely designed housepost illuminates how tradition can be re-interpreted into a modern day context, as can life lessons associated with stories and legends.  Point’s contemporized and beautifully designed work is a testament to her artistry and First Nation’s tradition and culture

  • Moon Amulet

    Tom Eneas

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Abalone shell, Copper

    The Moon controls tidal changes and illuminates the dark sky.  In many Nations the Raven is attributed for the gift of the Moon. Depending on the Nation, it is said that the Moon is the Sun’s partner, each being halves to a greater whole. Additionally, the Moon is associated with transformation and is regarded as an important protector and guardian spirit. Due to its mystical powers, Shamans sometimes call upon it as a spirit guide. Although not a common crest, it was exclusively the crest of a few highest-ranking Chiefs among the Haida nation and still remains their hereditary right today.

    Tom Eneas’s Moon Amulet reflects the Moon’s highly regarded innate spiritual powers. Carved from the spiritually endowed Red Cedar tree, this Moon Amulet is instilled with the beautiful decorative Abalone Shell which appears as the Moon’s illumination. Abalone Shell traditionally often referenced a high-status woman. This traditional work illustrates the more lucid southern carving style, in which the humanized Moon face’s shallow softer carving illuminates the wood’s grain providing the piece with strength and harmony.  Tom Eneas’s exquisite Moon Amulet encapsulates the Moon’s legendary spiritual grace.

     

  • Tang’waan’laanaa Sculpture

    Christian White

    Price upon request

    Argillite, Catlanite, Duugust stone, Abalone shell, Mother of Pearl, Mastodon Ivory

    Christian White’s monumental tribute to this ancient Haida legend is exquisitely carved and detailed with embellishments of precious Abalone, Mother of Pearl and Mastodon Ivory.

    Tang’waan’laanaa featured significantly in the old Haida stories.  He is Chief of the undersea world, the highest deity of the Haida ocean spirits, a figure of power and prestige.  Also known as ‘the One in the Sea’, he resides in the depths of the ocean floor. It is said that Tang’waan’laanaa is responsible for supporting the world because he controls the flow of wealth that comes into the world.  He is also grandfather to Raven.

    Tang’waan’laanaa is commonly portrayed holding a three-pronged spear to represent driftwood or a deadhead, which holds the seafarer’s power to control the ocean. Here Christian White has fashioned his so that it is reminiscent of Neptune’s trident, perhaps drawing an analogy to the Western version of the God of the Sea.

     

    For more details on shipping Ivory outside of Canada, please click here and then click open the Shipping section and scroll down to read more on Shipping Restrictions.

  • Shaman Transforming into the Spirit of the Raven

    Ron Joseph Telek

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Cedar bark, Leather

    22 x 7.5 x 15″ (including bark)

  • Raven Transformation Hat

    Isabel Rorick

    Price upon request

    Spruce root

    Isabel Rorick comes from a long line of weavers, including her great-grandmother Isabella Edenshaw; her grandmother, Selina Peratrovich; her mother, Primrose Adams, and her Aunt, Delores Churchill. Using the Haida language of form, Isabel incorporates many traditional designs into her baskets and hats, like that of the dragonfly, raven’s tail, and spider web or slug trail.

  • Moon Pendant

    Philip Janze

    Price upon request

    18K Yellow Gold, Abalone shell, Cast
    Edition 5 of 5

  • Sea Serpent Soul Catcher

    Ed E. Bryant

    Price upon request

    Cattle Bone, Abalone shell, Cedar bark

    Commonly used by a Shaman, soul catchers were used to cleanse human souls and spirits. If a person was sick, or perhaps possessed by a demon spirit, the soul catcher was used to coerce the evil spirit out of the body.  The open ends were caped with cedar bark to hold the soul until it was cleansed and brought back from the spirit world. The healed soul of the recipient was then returned to the body by the Shaman by blowing through the soul catcher and into to the patient’s mouth.

    The shape of the soul catcher is typically cut from animal bone in such a way that the ends are flared outward and the surface is carved with figures associated with the Shaman’s spirit guides. Spirit guides accompany the human spirit or soul on its transformative journey between worlds. The ends of the Soul Catcher were sealed to contain these spirits. They also protect the boundaries between the physical and spiritual world, keeping those involved in the healing ceremony safe from evil minded spirits and beings.  The symmetrical arrangement of the figures essentially defines objects of this type and the figures tend to more sculptural in appearance.

    Soul catchers are extremely powerful and respected healing instruments; because of this, they were often housed in special bentwood boxes to keep them safe.

     

    Soul Catcher: 1.25 x 6.75 x 1.25″

    Including Stand: 3.25 x 6.75 x 1.5″

    Box: 5.75 x 8.75 x 5″

  • Medeek (Grizzly Bear) Mask

    Henry Green

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar Wood, Cedar Bark, Copper, Abalone Shell, Hair, Acrylic Paint

  • Fishing Ground Panel

    Philip Gray

    Price upon request

    Killerwhale, Sea Bear, Salmon

    Red Cedar wood, Acrylic paint

  • Iksduq’iya & Qolun (Eagle & Beaver) Box

    Lyle Wilson

    Price upon request

    Sterling Silver, Engraved and Textured on Hollow-ware

    2015

    “My father’s Eagle Clan adopted me, but I was actually born into my mother’s Beaver Clan. Since the Haisla followed a matrilineal system, whereby every child was automatically included into its mother’s clan, my unusual adoption was due to the circumstances of the Eagle Clan having so many of its members die. Due to the early and unfamiliar diseases, everyone feared the clan would eventually become extinct.

    I’ve always loved the look of a full-size, traditional wooden bent-box and liked the idea of a smaller, silver box using the same traditional proportions. It adds a unique sculptural look to any small box which, once seen, becomes a more appreciated detail with every subsequent examination. The box’s construction technique is very deceptive; it looks solid but is actually a box-within-a-box, with the hollow spaces between each ‘box’ allowing for visually thicker walls. For this box, I decided to honor my connections to both Haisla Clans – Beaver and Eagle – by engraving each on one-half of the box. The box’s lid has another Eagle engraved on the top, and the Halibut, a sub-crest shared by both clans, is engraved around the edges.”

    -Lyle Wilson, 2016

     

  • “After the Ancients” Bracelet

    Lyle Wilson

    Price upon request

    Sterling silver, Textured, Engraved, Repoussé, Chased
    Hinged with Sterling silver Catch
    2015

    “Exploring one’s roots brings a healthy appreciation of one’s place in the scheme of things. The Pacific Northwest Coast (PNC) formline has undergone changes over the passage of time. What I wanted to do was to pay homage to that earlier, cleaner, straightforward, massive look of PNC art because it captures the sense of that era’s time. I learned from what work they left behind and so it impacts the work I do today.

    In this bracelet, a mixture of modern techniques – repoussé, chasing, engraving, texturing, fabrication – has been added to a deceptively simple facial image that’s present on early traditional bent-boxes; a face thought to represent a supernatural guardian of any treasures contained within the box.

    For me, and for this exhibition, this style of PNC imagery depiction on a bracelet seemed to be something that had a sense of inevitability because I have such admiration and respect for ancient PNC artists”

    -Lyle Wilson, 2016

  • Sun, Star & Raven Soapberry Spoon

    Lyle Wilson

    Price upon request

    Yellow Cedar wood, Ablone shell

    “This carved soapberry spoon has one of the more interesting tales of my exhibit; its nickname is ‘SHOW-STOPPER’ for good reason! While carving this piece, I kept pushing myself to go beyond what the original idea had been and was so consumed in pursuing that goal I became impatient and careless. I tried to use my carving tool for something it wasn’t designed to do and it slipped and cut my finger’s tendon!

    Thankfully it could be operated upon and repaired, but the healing period took 10 weeks out my carving schedule. As a result, my exhibition came to an abrupt halt and I had a lot of time to reflect on what had happened and why. When I eventually resumed carving, I spent a very long time on the ‘SHOW-STOPPER’ because, in my mind, although it’s small and it held up my show, it now deserved to become something extra-special. I’m extremely pleased with the way it turned out!

    The spoon depicts the traditional tale familiar to every Pacific Northwest Coast group: Raven discovering daylight. The sun, stars and moon can be present or left out of some versions. The Raven occupies the spoon’s bottom, while the handle is topped with the Sun on one side and the Star on the opposite side.”

    -Lyle Wilson, 2016

  • Shaman Battling for his Damned Soul

    Ron Joseph Telek

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Abalone shell, Water Buffalo Teeth, Whale teeth, Bear Claws

    For more details on shipping Ivory outside of Canada, please click here and then click open the Shipping section and scroll down to read more on Shipping Restrictions.

  • 3. Eagle, Killerwhale, Bear & Frog Model Pole

    Christian White

    Price upon request

    Argillite, Catlinite, Abalone shell

    Argillite is grey colour and a relatively soft stone to carve which hardens over time as it begins to oxidize once removed from the mine. As it is relatively a limited resource, it is difficult to obtain large pieces from the quarry. Apart from small totem poles like this, the kinds of objects carved from Argillite include plates with carved and incised designs, pendants, pipes, small boxes, and sculptured figures.

  • Wolf Headdress

    Tom Eneas

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Abalone shell, Fur, Acrylic paint

    On stand

    19 x 7.5 x 21.5″ (including fur)

    27.5 x 8 x 21.5″ (including stand)

  • Haida Bear & Human Glass Totem

    Clarence Mills

    Price upon request

    Glass, etched and sandblasted

    Created in the contemporary medium of glass, Clarence Mills’ Haida Bear with Human totem is an interplay between tradition and innovation. This piece makes a strong visual statement with its structured Haida form line, and yet the translucent nature of the glass softens the composition. The totem blends ancient animal symbolism within a stylized contemporary form and demonstrates how innovative Clarence is with this medium.

  • Haida Raven Glass Totem

    Clarence Mills

    Price upon request

    Glass, etched and sandblasted

    Created in the contemporary medium of glass, Clarence Mills’ Haida Raven totem is an interplay between tradition and innovation. This piece makes a strong visual statement with its structured Haida form line, and yet the translucent nature of the glass softens the composition. The totem blends ancient animal symbolism within a stylized contemporary form and demonstrates how innovative Clarence is with this medium.

  • Haida Eagle Glass Totem

    Clarence Mills

    Price upon request

    Glass, Etched & Sandblasted

    Created in the contemporary medium of glass, Clarence Mills’ Haida Eagle totem is an interplay between tradition and innovation. This piece makes a strong visual statement with its structured Haida form line, and yet the translucent nature of the glass softens the composition. The totem blends ancient animal symbolism within a stylized contemporary form and demonstrates how innovative Clarence is with this medium.

  • Eagle Ring

    Jim Hart

    Price upon request

    18K Yellow Gold, 14pt Diamond, Bezel Setting
    Cast & Reworked by Hand
    Width: 3/8″
    Size: 11

  • Gax (Raven): Shamanic Version of Light

    Lyle Wilson

    Price upon request

    Marine Ivory, Abalone shell

    For more details on shipping Ivory outside of Canada, please click here and then click open the Shipping section and scroll down to read more on Shipping Restrictions.

  • Halxinix (Orca) & Eel Sculpture

    Lyle Wilson

    Price upon request

    Marine Ivory, Abalone shell

    For more details on shipping Ivory outside of Canada, please click here and then click open the Shipping section and scroll down to read more on Shipping Restrictions.

  • Nolax’s (Sea Lion) Miya (Salmon) Journey

    Lyle Wilson

    Price upon request

    Marine Ivory, Abalone shell

    For more details on shipping Ivory outside of Canada, please click here and then click open the Shipping section and scroll down to read more on Shipping Restrictions.

  • Raven Stealing the Light Basket

    Isabel Rorick

    Price upon request

    Spruce root, Acrylic paint

    Hand-painted by Alfred Adams (Isabel’s brother)

    Isabel Rorick comes from a long line of weavers, including her great-grandmother Isabella Edenshaw; her grandmother, Selina Peratrovich; her mother, Primrose Adams, and her Aunt, Delores Churchill. Using the Haida language of form, Isabel incorporates many traditional designs into her baskets and hats, like that of the dragonfly, raven’s tail, and spider web or slug trail.

  • Raven & Frog Totem Pole

    Don Yeomans

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar Wood

    For inquiries on totem pole commissions, please click here.

  • Raven Rattle-lid Basket

    Isabel Rorick

    Price upon request

    Spruce root, Acrylic paint

    Hand-painted by Alfred Adams (Isabel’s brother)

    Isabel Rorick comes from a long line of weavers, including her great-grandmother Isabella Edenshaw; her grandmother, Selina Peratrovich; her mother, Primrose Adams, and her Aunt, Delores Churchill. Using the Haida language of form, Isabel incorporates many traditional designs into her baskets and hats, like that of the dragonfly, raven’s tail, and spider web or slug trail.

  • Ancestral Spirit Bentwood Box

    Henry Green

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Acrylic paint

    Henry Green’s ‘Ancestral Spirit Box’ demonstrates the extensive history of the artist’s Tsimshian community. Each panel has complex layers of family history throughout and is essentially Henry’s ancestry carved into the wood.

    The central figure of ‘Ancestral Spirit Bentwood Box’ represents a story told to Henry by his father regarding the importance of paying respect to the supernatural spirit Nok-nok.

    Along the Nass River in northern BC, where there were many Tsimshian villages situated, there are two large boulders of important significance. While travelling in the canoes along the Nass River, whenever the Tsimshian people came upon these two boulders, they would stop and pay tribute to the Nok-nok spirit leaving offerings of food and gifts while performing a ceremonial dance. They believed this practice would allow them safe passage and protection during their journey. On Henry Green’s bentwood box, the Nok-nok spirit is depicted with his face and hands projecting outwards in friendship and peace.

    The additional three sides of the box depict an evolution of ancestral crest designs. Through supernatural events and intermarriage, clans would gain and lose crest figures. Each side of “Ancestral Spirit Box” is the visual telling of Henry’s personal lineage and characterizes the interchange of crests throughout the living generations. The main form-line design grows and changes, taking on elements of new creatures such as the Eagle, Salmon, and Raven to name a few.

  • Bear, Eagle & Wolf Panel Pipe

    Gary Olver

    Price upon request

    Catlinite, Abalone shell

    Bear, Eagle, Wolf with Frog, Raven and Chief

    Panel pipes are usually flat, featuring a single line of rounded figures strung along a horizontal plane. The figures are always inter-connected, typically through the mouth or tongue. This is said to symbolically represent the figures inhaling magical powers from each other and sharing their knowledge.

  • Watchman, Eagles, Frog & Human Totem

    Garner Moody

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Acrylic paint

    For inquiries on totem pole commissions, please click here.

  • Salish Confluence Necklace

    Dean Larden

    Price upon request

    Sterling silver, Abalone shell, Engraved
    14″ Sterling silver chain attached.

    The artist’s inspiration for this stunning necklace comes from his experiences with angling fishing. While taking in the scenery and natural beauty of his environment, Dean feels it takes on a form of meditation and drives his creativity further.

  • Bear Basket

    Isabel Rorick

    Price upon request

    Spruce root, Acrylic paint

    Hand-painted by Alfred Adams (Isabel’s brother)

    Isabel Rorick comes from a long line of weavers, including her great-grandmother Isabella Edenshaw; her grandmother, Selina Peratrovich; her mother, Primrose Adams, and her Aunt, Delores Churchill. Using the Haida language of form, Isabel incorporates many traditional designs into her baskets and hats, like that of the dragonfly, raven’s tail, and spider web or slug trail.

  • Raven Rattle

    Lloyd Wadhams Sr.

    Price upon request

    Stained wood

    1985

  • Grouse Mask

    Joe Peters Jr.

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Cedar bark, Feathers, Acrylic paint

    1985

  • Raven Ladle

    R. 7Lewin

    Price upon request

    Yellow Cedar wood, Acrylic paint

    2014

    Spoons and ladles were traditionally made from either cedar wood or the horn of a mountain sheep, and their handles were carved with family crest images. Historically, these exquisitely sculptured objects were primarily created by people in Northern Nations, and were highly sought after by other nations. During potlatches [festive gatherings], cedar ladles decorated with the hosting family’s crests were used to serve food, while the elaborately carved mountain sheep spoons were distributed as gifts among the many guests.

    Today, spoon and ladle productions are based on these traditional objects and are meant to be both objects of function and display. In addition to traditional mediums such as cedar wood, goat or mountain sheep horn, many modern-day spoons and ladles are constructed of gold, silver and pewter.

  • Halibut Hook

    Cicero August

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Bone, String, Waxed Cord, Acrylic paint

  • Cod Lure

    Simon Charlie

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Twine, Acrylic paint

  • Killerwhale Mask

    Kevin Daniel Cranmer

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Abalone shell, Copper, Acrylic paint

    Articulated

    2014

  • Salmon Plaque

    Kevin Daniel Cranmer

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Abalone shell, Copper, Acrylic paint

    2015

  • Beaver & Halibut with Squirrel Totem Pole

    Lyle Wilson

    Price upon request

    Yellow Cedar wood, Acrylic paint

    This stunning pole was inspired by the story of how the Beaver Clan came to be part of the Haisla Nation. Each figure depicted on the pole represents an important episode in the journey that the characters in the story take. From top to bottom, the figures being depicted include a squirrel, a halibut, a giant man that is holding an otter, and two beavers.

    This particular Haisla story is quite old, and Lyle is one of the few individuals who still knows all of the details. The pole is Lyle’s contemporary portrayal of the tale, which pays tribute to the ancient family connections between the present-day Haisla and their neighbors.

  • Raven with Light Sculpture

    Christian White

    Price upon request

    Argillite, Catlinite, Mother of Pearl, Abalone shell

  • Eagle & Thunderbird with Moon & Salmon Diptych Panel

    Brent Sparrow

    Price upon request

    Yellow Cedar wood

    Each panel: 72 x 15 x 1.5″

    Two panels: 72 x 30 x 1.5″

  • Discovering Totem Poles: A Traveller’s Guide

    Aldona Jonaitis

    $7.99 CAD

    An indispensable guide for identifying totem poles along British Columbia’s inside passage from Vancouver to Alaska.

    Whether rising from a forest mist or soaring overhead in parks and museums, magnificent cedar totem poles have captivated the attention and imagination of visitors to Washington State, British Columbia, and Alaska.

    Discovering Totem Poles is the first guidebook to focus on the complex and fascinating histories of the specific poles visitors encounter in Seattle, Victoria, Vancouver, Alert Bay, Prince Rupert, Haida Gwaii (Queen Charlotte Islands), Ketchikan, Sitka, and Juneau. It debunks common misconceptions about totem poles and explores the stories behind the making and displaying of 90 different poles.

    Travelers with this guide in their pocket will return home with a deeper knowledge about these monumental carvings, their place in history and the people who made them.

    Published in 2012

    Paperback

  • The Raven Steals the Light

    Robert Bringhurst and Bill Reid

    $14.95 CAD

    Ten masterful, complex drawings by Bill reid are accompanied by ten episodes from Haida mythology told by Bill Reid and Robert Bringhurst.  The result brings Haida art and mythology alive as never before.

    Published in 1996

    Softcover

  • Looking at Indian Art of the Northwest Coast

    Hilary Stewart

    $17.95 CAD

    This indispensable and beautifully illustrated book is the first to introduce everyone, from the casual observer to the serious collector of Northwest Coast prints, to the forms, cultural background and structures of this highly imaginative art.

    Published in 1992

    Softcover

  • Looking at Totem Poles

    Hilary Stewart

    $17.95 CAD

    Looking at Totem Poles is an indispensable guide to 110 poles which exist in outdoor locations in coastal British Columbia and Alaska. Hilary Stewart provides an account to the various poles types, their function and symbolism and how they were raised.

    Published in 1993

    Softcover

  • The Whaling People of the West Coast of Vancouver Island and Cape Flattery

    Eugene Arima and Alan Hoover

    $19.95 CAD

    The Whaling People live along the west coast of Vancouver Island and Cape Flattery in Washington. They comprise more than 20 First Nations, including the Nuu-chah-nulth (formerly called Nootka), Ditidaht, Pacheedaht and Makah. These socially related peoples enjoyed a highly organized, tradition-based culture for centuries before Europeans arrived. As whaling societies, they had a unique relationship with the sea.

    This book celebrates the still-thriving cultures of the Whaling People, who survived the devastating effects of colonial power and influences. It features 12 narratives collected from First Nations elders, each illustrated with original drawings by the celebrated Hesquiaht artist, Tim Paul. The book also includes a history of treaty making in BC, leading up to the recently ratified Maa-nulth Treaty signed by five First Nations of the Whaling People.

     

    Published in 2011 by the Royal BC Museum

    Softcover

  • Bill Reid Collected

    Martine J. Reid

    $19.95 CAD

    Over his lifetime, Bill Reid (1920 – 1998) created many historic sculptures, paintings jewellery pieces and serigraphs inspired by his Haida heritage. The large bronze sculpture The Spirit of Haida Gwaii, nicknamed The Jade Canoe and displayed at the Vancouver International Airport, and The Raven and the First Men, a yellow cedar carving, have both been featured on the Canadian $20 bill. In addition to the immense praise he received for his artwork, Reid was also the recipient of the National Aboriginal Achievement Award for Lifetime Achievement in 1994. This volume showcases more than 150 of Reid’s most significant works in beautiful photographs.

    Softcover

  • Red: A Haida Manga

    Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas

    $19.95 CAD

    An innovative graphic novel, Red is the epic tale of a Haida hero, his rage and his quest for retribution.

    Referencing a classic Haida oral narrative, this stunning full-colour graphic novel documents the powerful story of Red, a leader so blinded by revenge that he leads his community to the brink of war and destruction.

    Set in the islands off the northwest coast of B.C., it tells the tale of orphan Red and his sister, Jaada. When raiders attack their village, Red, still a boy, escapes dramatically. But Jaada is whisked away. The loss of Jaada breeds a seething anger, and Red sets out to find his sister and exact revenge on her captors.

    Red blends traditional Haida imagery into a Japanese manga-styled story. Tragic and timeless, it is reminiscent of such classic stories as Oedipus Rex, Macbeth and King Lear.

    This innovation in contemporary storytelling consists of 108 pages of hand-painted illustrations. When arranged in a specific order, the panels of the narrative create a Haida formline image four metres long. The sequence for this complex design is displayed on the inside jacket.

    Published in 2009

    Paperback

  • Olaka iku Da Nana – It’s a Good Day Book

    Corrine Hunt

    $20.00 CAD

    “This book tells my story behind the [2010 Olympic] medals – the peace symbol, the soul replaced by the hand, ayasu, “stop hey what’s that sign,” my childhood hippyness all groovy with happiness, a journey to far out places doing things I have never done before like co-designing an Olympic Medal.

    The story is about community, the random nature of connections, the chance meetings, and the simple idea that we need each other to thrive, much like my community which continually supports me in my random acts of madness, kindness or both.” – Corrine Hunt

    Published in 2012

    Hardcover

     

     

  • Understanding Northwest Coast Art

    Cheryl Shearer

    $22.95 CAD

    This easily read book introduces the reader to various symbols, crests and beings depicted in Northwest Coast artworks. Shearer provides brief descriptions of design conventions, elements and differences between cultural groups while explaining the interconnections between art, myth and ceremony.

    Published in 2000

    Softcover

  • My Name Is Arnaktauyok

    Germaine Arnaktauyok & Gyu Oh

    $24.95 CAD

    Germaine Arnaktauyok is one of the Canadian North’s most prolific and recognizable artists. In this book, she tells the story of her life in her own words: her “very traditional Inuk life” growing up in Nunavut at a camp near Igloolik, and her experiences later in a residential school in Chesterfield Inlet; her education as an artist in Winnipeg and Ottawa; and her return to the North, where she continues to create drawings, etchings, and illustrations that have been featured in museums and galleries worldwide.

     

    She also provides commentary on several of her works, offering a seldom seen perspective on her inspiration and process. Featuring over one hundred full-colour reproductions of Germaine Arnaktauyok’s fascinating pieces from throughout her career, this beautiful book provides an in-depth look at one of the world’s most important artists.

     

    Published: 2015

    Softcover

  • Our Hands Remember: Recovering Sanikiluaq Basket Sewing

    $24.95 CAD

    Sanikiluaq, a small Inuit community in the Belcher Islands region of the Far North, has a long history of artistic output. But as the demand for stone carvings grew, grass basket sewing―once a traditional skill for Inuit women―faded from the community consciousness. That was until a group of women, including educator and artist Margaret Lawrence, came together to renew the lost art of basket sewing.

    In Our Hands Remember: Recovering Sanikiluaq Basket Sewing, Lawrence guides readers through creating their own grass baskets in the unique style of the Sanikiluaq region with step-by-step instructions and photographs. From tips on preparing the grass and forming even coils to the different types of embellishments, this book is accessible to all skill levels.

     

    Published: 2018

    Softcover

  • Unikkaaqtuat: An Introduction to Inuit Myths & Legends

    Neil Christopher

    $24.95 CAD

    In this exhaustive story collection, the rich tradition of Inuit storytelling becomes accessible to the rest of Canada for the first time. Unipkaaqtut is the Inuit word meaning “to tell stories.”

    This definitive collection of Inuit legends is thoughtfully introduced and carefully annotated to provide the historical and cultural context in which to understand this rich oral tradition.

    Read about the origin of thunder and lightning, the tale of the man who married a fox and many animal fables from the North. Fascinating and educational, this little-known part of Canada’s heritage will captivate readers of all ages. As a work of historical and cultural preservation, this text will be invaluable to those studying Inuit.

    Published in 2011

    Paperback

  • Understanding Northwest Coast Indigenous Jewelry; The Art, The Artists, The History

    Alexander Dawkins

    $24.95 CAD

    As beautiful as it is useful, Understanding Northwest Coast Indigenous Jewelry is an invaluable tool for anyone interested in learning about or deepening their understanding of a fascinating craft.

    Indigenous hand-engraved jewelry from the Pacific Northwest Coast is among the most distinctive, innovative, and highly sought-after art being produced in North America today. But these artworks are more than just stunning—every bracelet, ring, and pendant is also the product of a fascinating backstory, a specialized set of techniques, and a talented artist.

    With a clearly written text, a foreword by award-winning First Nations artist Corrine Hunt, and more than one hundred striking color photographs and sidebars, Understanding Northwest Coast Indigenous Jewelry offers an illuminating look at an exquisite craft and the context in which it is practiced.

    Providing a step-by-step overview of various techniques, the book also introduces the specifics of formline design, highlights the traits of the most common animal symbols used, offers tips for identification, and features biographies and works from over fifty of the Coast’s best-known jewelers. Finally, it delves into the history of the art form, from the earliest horn and copper cuff bracelets to cutting-edge contemporary works and everything in between.

    Softcover

  • Totem Pole Carving: Bringing a Pole to Life

    Vickie Jensen

    $26.95 CAD

    The totem pole is a distinctive and widely admired form of traditional Northwest Coast Native art.  Once nearly lost, this art form is alive and thriving today.  In this beautifully photographed book, Vickie Jensen collaborates with Norman Tait, a renowned Nisga’a artist, and his crew of young carvers to document the process of transforming a log into a totem pole.

    Throughout the carving process, Tait requires the apprentices to make their own tools, design their regalia and practice traditional drumming, songs and dances.  He teaches the young carvers that carving a pole requires more than time and labour, more than a firm understanding of the tools and techniques and more than artistic and emotional commitment.  The process involves respecting and following tradition and becoming involved in their cultural background.

    Published in 2003

    Softcover

  • Nanuq: Life With Polar Bears

    $27.95 CAD

    Nanuq: Life with Polar Bears features gorgeous wildlife photography of polar bears alongside first-hand accounts of experiences of living alongside the great sea bear.

    From close encounters with angry bears to the beauty of watching a polar bear climb an iceberg with its claws and traditional mythology surrounding life with polar bears, this book gives readers outside the Arctic a first-hand look at what life with polar bears is really like.

    Photographs by Paul Souders

     

    Published: 2016

    Hardcover

  • Cedar

    Hilary Stewart

    $29.95 CAD

    Hilary Stewart explains through her vivid descriptions, 550 drawings and 50 photographs, the tools and techniques used, as well as the superbly crafted objects and their uses in the context of daily and ceremonial life. Anecdotes, oral history and the accounts of early explorers, traders, missionaries and native elders highlight the text.

    Published in 1995

    Softcover

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