• Seagles

    lessLIE

    $275.00 CAD

    Serigraph, Edition of 50

    2007

    Unframed

    (For inquiries on custom framing, please contact the gallery)


    in this design
    you see eagles

    in this design
    you see seagulls.

    in this design, I am attempting to mediate between literacy and Coast Salish visual art. Hence the punning of the title “sEAGLES,” which is a way of making a visual pun, and making literacy visual. At the top and bottom of this design, there is the suggestion of the letter “s,” which simultanously forms the eagle wings while defining the seagull heads. So visual punning is created through both the painted design and the title of this piece.

    -lessLIE

     

     


  • Two Salmon

    lessLIE

    $150.00 CAD

    Serigraph, Edition of 150

    2007

    Unframed

    (For inquiries on custom framing, please contact the gallery)


    “Some of my work, when simply depicting nature and animals, is a visual tribute to the greatness of nature and animals. This design is a tribute to salmon. On a formal level, the middle of the design — the eccentric circle and the negative ovals above and below the trigons, have a minor northern Northwest Coast influence, yet they are rendered in a style which is distinctly Coast Salish. Concentric circles are design elements of Coast Salish art, but in the case of this design, they are eccentric circles. Concentric ovals are design elements of the Coast Salish art, but in the case of this design, they are simply negative ovals flanking a negative trigon. Many northern Northwest Coast designs utilize negative cirlces, ovals, and ovoids to fill in large positive spaces. How many influences a contemporary Coast Salish artist can accept from Haida art without succumbing to a Haida-centric perspective is a matter of cultrual conFUSION.”

    –lessLIE


  • Pro Creation

    lessLIE

    $250.00 CAD

    Serigraph, Edition of 100

    2007

    Unframed

    (For inquiries on custom framing, please contact the gallery)


    “This contemporary Coast Salish design, titled “Pro Creation”, through the act of creativity,is a celebration of the act of procreation. In the design, two salmon heads are depicted, the negative crescentric space simultaneously defining their mouths, as well as defining each other’s lower jaw. This simple visual punning represents interconnectedness through procreation. This simple visual punning also represents the beginnings of the offspring of the two salmon. In some of philosophical musings, I have often wondered which act is great, creation or procreation? I came to the conclusion that procreation is great than creation, since creation, as a human culture, woudl not exist without procreation. I also felt that the lIFe of one human being is much greater than the body of work of any artist. Recently though, I have felt that creatively creates culture, and makes the procreation of many generations possible. So I now see both creation and procreation as both being great acts of humankind.

    On a personal leve, althought I am not really “pro-choice” or “pro-life”, my myOTHER , when she was a sixteen year old girl with me, was considering abortion. With love for her, I am thankful that she gave birth to me. If she never procreated me, the creativity of my lIFe would not exisit.”

    — lessLIE


  • Spirits of Our Time

    Rande Cook

    $300.00 CAD

    Serigraph, Edition of 200

     

    Unframed

    (For inquiries on custom framing, please contact the gallery)

  • Salmon Sculpture

    Chester (Chaz) Patrick

    $980.00 CAD

    Exclusive to Coastal Peoples Fine Arts Gallery

    Glass; etched and sandblasted (Glass thickness 12mm)

    Salmon are honoured and celebrated by all coastal peoples: the fish serves as a powerful symbol of regeneration, self-sacrifice and perseverance.

    Shortages of Salmon are traditionally attributed to human disrespect and refusal to listen to and live by the wisdom of elders. The Pacific Northwest Coast peoples believed that Salmon were actually people with eternal life who lived in a large house far under the ocean. In spring, they put on their Salmon disguises and offered themselves to humans as food.

  • Sun of Hummingbirds

    lessLIE

    $250.00 CAD

    Serigraph, Edition of 100

    2006

    Unframed

    (For inquiries on custom framing, please contact the gallery)


    “This rectangular Coast Salish design depicts the sun flanked by four hummingbirds. The round split u-forms at the ends of the design suggest red flower petals. Rufous Hummingbirds, a species of hummingbird that migrates to Coast Salish territory in the spring, are drawn to red colours, sometimes mistaking anything red for flowers from which they can feed on nectar. As a contemporary Coast Salish artist, I have always been fascinated by hummingbirds because of their beautiful appearance, small size, and unique way of flying. Whenever I hEAR hummingbirds swooping down around wooded areas, I am reminded that spring and warm weather have arrived.”

    –lessLIE


  • Equinox

    Andy Everson

    $250.00 CAD

    Giclee, Edition of 50

    2006

    Unframed

    (For inquiries on custom framing, please contact the gallery)

  • Pacific Spirit, State I

    Susan Point RCA

    $875.00 CAD

    Serigraph, Edition of 80

    2006

    Unframed

    (For inquiries on custom framing, please contact the gallery)

  • Haida Eagle Pole

    Geoff Greene

    RESERVED

    Glass, Etched and Sandblasted, 20K Gold Leaf, Edition of 57

    Glass thickness 12mm

    Exclusive to Coastal Peoples Fine Arts Gallery – currently available by custom order only – please ask us for details

    Geoff Greene’s Haida Eagle Totem pays tribute to an important symbol and crest figure to the Haida nation. Created in the contemporary medium of glass, the Haida Eagle Totem celebrates traditional design within a luminous setting that speaks to the evolution of the classic Haida form.

    The Eagle is respected for its intelligence and power as well as its vision both figurative and literal; it claims both honor and a high stature. The Eagle Clan is traditionally the most prominent family and the Eagle Chief the most powerful chief. Although revered as a powerful hunter, the Eagle’s feathers are considered sacred. Traditionally, Shamans believed that Eagle feathers possessed healing powers and thus used them in various ceremonial and ritual contexts; today these feathers are still strewn to welcome an honored guest.

    Geoff Greene’s beautifully etched and sandblasted Haida Eagle Totem employs the magnificent translucent nature of glass in its finish along with the accent of gold leaf to provide additional depth and interest within this unique work. Masterly created, this piece blends ancient animal symbolism within a stylized contemporary form and demonstrates how many artists are setting themselves apart through their unique concepts.

    Available with Stainless steel or Natural Maple wood base.

  • Tranquility

    Andy Everson

    $200.00 CAD

    Giclee, Edition of 50

    2001

    Unframed

    (For inquiries on custom framing, please contact the gallery)

  • Beaver Swimming

    Norman Tait

    $1,100.00 CAD

    Serigraph, Edition of 95

    Unframed

    (For inquiries on custom framing, please contact the gallery)

    The Beaver appears in Northwest mythology and is a family crest in many regions throughout the Northwest Coast. According to legend, the first Beaver was a woman, whose husband frequently went on long hunting and fishing trips. In his absence, his lonely wife took solace swimming, enlarging her pond with a dam and building her own water dwelling. Eventually, she transformed into a Beaver and their children were Beaver People, founding the Beaver lineage.

    In mythology, they are often associated with the powerful undersea supernatural beings and the magic Giant Beaver can cause natural disaster with one slap of its wide, strong tail. Characterisically, the Beaver is known to keep to himself and cares little for the activities of the humans, except when they are directly affected. Thus, they often give wise advice so it is important to listen when they do decide to speak.

  • The Black Canoe: Bill Reid and the Spirit of Haida Gwaii

    Robert Bringhurst and Ulli Steltzer

    $39.95 CAD

    Ulli Steltzer’s photographs, taken over five years, record the genesis and development of the Black Canoe and of each creature within it. The images offer insight into the sculpture’s final form and reveals many aspects of the work otherwise lost forever to view.

    Published in 1995

    Softcover

  • Northwest Coast Indian Art: An Analysis of Form

    Bill Holm

    $44.90 CAD

    An important contribution to the fields of art and anthropology, Holm’s work is a genuinely analytical study of the basic elements of form which characterizes a particular aboriginal art style.

    Published: 50th Anniversary Edition, 2015

    Softcover

    Bill Holm passed away on December 16, 2020 at the age of 95.

  • Native American Art

    Peter Bolz and Hans-Ulrich Sanner

    $55.00 CAD

    The Collections of the Ethnological Museum Berlin.

    The North American collection in the Ethnologisches Museum Berlin ranks among the most important in Europe. Different Native American cultures of the United States and Canada are represented here as well as the peoples of the Arctic.

    Published in 1999

    Softcover

  • Argillite: Art of the Haida

    Leslie Drew and Douglas Wilson

    $40.00 CAD

    Some of the last copies of this book are available at our gallery as it is no longer being published.

    Drew and Wilson outline the history of the Haida in relation to argillite carving.

    In a key chapter, “A World Apart”, the reader is led through a tangle of Haida beliefs and legends seen through the artist’s mind as he sought to express the world around him.

    The technical aspects of argillite – its nature, how it was quarried, the relationship of the carver to his material, clues to a carver’s identity through his carving style, the transformation of argillite art with the coming of the [Europeans], and its resurgence alongside contemporary art are detailed.

    Argillite is study that will appeal to collectors, students of [First Nations] art and culture, and anyone interested in recapturing the formidable and legendary consciousness of this ancient people.

    Published in 1980

    Hardcover

  • Looking at Totem Poles

    Hilary Stewart

    $17.95 CAD

    Looking at Totem Poles is an indispensable guide to 110 poles which exist in outdoor locations in coastal British Columbia and Alaska. Hilary Stewart provides an account to the various poles types, their function and symbolism and how they were raised.

    Published in 1993

    Softcover

  • Looking at Indian Art of the Northwest Coast

    Hilary Stewart

    $17.95 CAD

    This indispensable and beautifully illustrated book is the first to introduce everyone, from the casual observer to the serious collector of Northwest Coast prints, to the forms, cultural background and structures of this highly imaginative art.

    Published in 1992

    Softcover

  • Inuksuit

    Norman Hallendy

    $35.00 CAD

    Inuksuit are amongst the oldest and most important objects placed by humans within the vast Arctic landscape. Beautifully photographed, this first comprehensive book tells about the Arctic Inuksuit as told by Inuit Elders.

     

    Published in 2001

    Softcover

  • Cedar

    Hilary Stewart

    $29.95 CAD

    Hilary Stewart explains through her vivid descriptions, 550 drawings and 50 photographs, the tools and techniques used, as well as the superbly crafted objects and their uses in the context of daily and ceremonial life. Anecdotes, oral history and the accounts of early explorers, traders, missionaries and native elders highlight the text.

    Published in 1995

    Softcover

  • Understanding Northwest Coast Art

    Cheryl Shearer

    $22.95 CAD

    This easily read book introduces the reader to various symbols, crests and beings depicted in Northwest Coast artworks. Shearer provides brief descriptions of design conventions, elements and differences between cultural groups while explaining the interconnections between art, myth and ceremony.

    Published in 2000

    Softcover

  • Bill Reid and Beyond: Expanding on Modern Native Art

    Karen Dufffek and Charlotte Townsend-Gault

    $45.00 CAD

    Academically charged, this book offers a wide-ranging and thought-provoking collection of art and cultural scholars reappraisals regarding Bill Reid’s career and compelling artwork. Aware of political, economic and social events, this book examines and adds to the ongoing debate about aboriginality and modern art.

    Published in 2005

    Hardcover

  • Eagle Frontlet

    Charles Peter Heit

    $8,200.00 CAD

    Birch wood, Abalone, Ivory

    For more details on shipping Ivory outside of Canada, please click here and then click open the Shipping section and scroll down to read more on Shipping Restrictions.

    A frontlet is a forehead mask attached to a woven headpiece.  It is worn by chiefs and high-ranking individuals as a display of crests and status.  Frontlets are often decorated with materials that are symbols of wealth and power: abalone shell, operculum shell, sea lion whiskers, feathers and/or ermine pelts.

    The intelligent Eagle symbolizes status, power, peace and friendship.

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