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  • Gax (Raven): Shamanic Version of Light

    Lyle Wilson

    Price upon request

    Marine Ivory, Abalone shell

    For more details on shipping Ivory outside of Canada, please click here and then click open the Shipping section and scroll down to read more on Shipping Restrictions.

  • Halxinix (Orca) & Eel Sculpture

    Lyle Wilson

    Price upon request

    Marine Ivory, Abalone shell

    For more details on shipping Ivory outside of Canada, please click here and then click open the Shipping section and scroll down to read more on Shipping Restrictions.

  • Nolax’s (Sea Lion) Miya (Salmon) Journey

    Lyle Wilson

    Price upon request

    Marine Ivory, Abalone shell

    For more details on shipping Ivory outside of Canada, please click here and then click open the Shipping section and scroll down to read more on Shipping Restrictions.

  • Haida Lineage Pole – 3ft

    Geoff Greene

    Price upon request

    Glass, etched and sandblasted, Edition of 45

    Natural Maple wood base

    Various heights are available beginning at 3+ feet

    The interplay between tradition and innovation is the premise for this contemporary totem pole. While cedar wood predominates, noted Haida artist, Geoff Greene has applied his foresight in designing traditional Haida motifs in the contemporary medium of glass. It makes a strong visual statement with its structured Haida form line, yet the translucent nature of the glass softens the composition, clearly defining the progression of Haida art. From the top, the Eagle is portrayed perched, with the Raven and Moon following. The Eagle signifies peace and friendship, while the Raven is the folk hero who created the Moon, stars and the universe. The Bear, at the base of the totem, is a close relative to mankind known to share both human and animal traits.

  • Raven Stealing the Light Basket

    Isabel Rorick

    Price upon request

    Spruce root, Acrylic paint

    Hand-painted by Alfred Adams (Isabel’s brother)

    Isabel Rorick comes from a long line of weavers, including her great-grandmother Isabella Edenshaw; her grandmother, Selina Peratrovich; her mother, Primrose Adams, and her Aunt, Delores Churchill. Using the Haida language of form, Isabel incorporates many traditional designs into her baskets and hats, like that of the dragonfly, raven’s tail, and spider web or slug trail.

  • Raven & Frog Totem Pole

    Don Yeomans

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar Wood

    For inquiries on totem pole commissions, please click here.

  • Raven Rattle-lid Basket

    Isabel Rorick

    Price upon request

    Spruce root, Acrylic paint

    Hand-painted by Alfred Adams (Isabel’s brother)

    Isabel Rorick comes from a long line of weavers, including her great-grandmother Isabella Edenshaw; her grandmother, Selina Peratrovich; her mother, Primrose Adams, and her Aunt, Delores Churchill. Using the Haida language of form, Isabel incorporates many traditional designs into her baskets and hats, like that of the dragonfly, raven’s tail, and spider web or slug trail.

  • Ancestral Spirit Bentwood Box

    Henry Green

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Acrylic paint

    Henry Green’s ‘Ancestral Spirit Box’ demonstrates the extensive history of the artist’s Tsimshian community. Each panel has complex layers of family history throughout and is essentially Henry’s ancestry carved into the wood.

    The central figure of ‘Ancestral Spirit Bentwood Box’ represents a story told to Henry by his father regarding the importance of paying respect to the supernatural spirit Nok-nok.

    Along the Nass River in northern BC, where there were many Tsimshian villages situated, there are two large boulders of important significance. While travelling in the canoes along the Nass River, whenever the Tsimshian people came upon these two boulders, they would stop and pay tribute to the Nok-nok spirit leaving offerings of food and gifts while performing a ceremonial dance. They believed this practice would allow them safe passage and protection during their journey. On Henry Green’s bentwood box, the Nok-nok spirit is depicted with his face and hands projecting outwards in friendship and peace.

    The additional three sides of the box depict an evolution of ancestral crest designs. Through supernatural events and intermarriage, clans would gain and lose crest figures. Each side of “Ancestral Spirit Box” is the visual telling of Henry’s personal lineage and characterizes the interchange of crests throughout the living generations. The main form-line design grows and changes, taking on elements of new creatures such as the Eagle, Salmon, and Raven to name a few.

  • Bear, Eagle & Wolf Panel Pipe

    Gary Olver

    Price upon request

    Catlinite, Abalone shell

    Bear, Eagle, Wolf with Frog, Raven and Chief

    Panel pipes are usually flat, featuring a single line of rounded figures strung along a horizontal plane. The figures are always inter-connected, typically through the mouth or tongue. This is said to symbolically represent the figures inhaling magical powers from each other and sharing their knowledge.

  • Watchman, Eagles, Frog & Human Totem

    Garner Moody

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Acrylic paint

    For inquiries on totem pole commissions, please click here.

  • Salish Confluence Necklace

    Dean Larden

    Price upon request

    Sterling silver, Abalone shell, Engraved
    14″ Sterling silver chain attached.

    The artist’s inspiration for this stunning necklace comes from his experiences with angling fishing. While taking in the scenery and natural beauty of his environment, Dean feels it takes on a form of meditation and drives his creativity further.

  • Bear Basket

    Isabel Rorick

    Price upon request

    Spruce root, Acrylic paint

    Hand-painted by Robin Rorick

    Isabel Rorick comes from a long line of weavers, including her great-grandmother Isabella Edenshaw; her grandmother, Selina Peratrovich; her mother, Primrose Adams, and her Aunt, Delores Churchill. Using the Haida language of form, Isabel incorporates many traditional designs into her baskets and hats, like that of the dragonfly, raven’s tail, and spider web or slug trail.

  • Raven Rattle

    Lloyd Wadhams Sr.

    Price upon request

    Stained wood

    1985

  • Grouse Mask

    Joe Peters Jr.

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Cedar bark, Feathers, Acrylic paint

    1985

  • Raven Ladle

    R. 7Lewin

    Price upon request

    Yellow Cedar wood, Acrylic paint

    2014

    Spoons and ladles were traditionally made from either cedar wood or the horn of a mountain sheep, and their handles were carved with family crest images. Historically, these exquisitely sculptured objects were primarily created by people in Northern Nations, and were highly sought after by other nations. During potlatches [festive gatherings], cedar ladles decorated with the hosting family’s crests were used to serve food, while the elaborately carved mountain sheep spoons were distributed as gifts among the many guests.

    Today, spoon and ladle productions are based on these traditional objects and are meant to be both objects of function and display. In addition to traditional mediums such as cedar wood, goat or mountain sheep horn, many modern-day spoons and ladles are constructed of gold, silver and pewter.

  • Halibut Hook

    Cicero August

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Bone, String, Waxed Cord, Acrylic paint

  • Cod Lure

    Simon Charlie

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Twine, Acrylic paint

  • Killerwhale Mask

    Kevin Daniel Cranmer

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Abalone shell, Copper, Acrylic paint

    Articulated

    2014

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