AUTHENTIC. TIMELESS. GIFTS.
Naturally beautiful, First Nations art and the artisans who create it deliver the unique flavour of Vancouver – a city shaped by its local culture. Express your appreciation or recognition with fine gifts from our collection. For more gift ideas, explore our entire collection or ask us for more details.

  • Haida Lineage Pole – 6ft

    Geoff Greene

    $9,800.00 CAD

    Glass, etched and sandblasted, Edition of 45

    Natural Maple wood or Stainless steel base

    Exclusive to Coastal Peoples Fine Arts Gallery

    The interplay between tradition and innovation is the premise for this contemporary totem pole.  While cedar wood predominates, noted Haida artist Geoff Greene has applied his foresight in designing traditional Haida motifs in the contemporary medium of glass.  It makes a strong visual statement with its structured Haida form line, yet the translucent nature of the glass softens the composition, clearly defining the progression of Haida art.  From the top, the Eagle is portrayed perched, with the Raven and Moon following. The Eagle signifies peace and friendship, while the Raven is the folk hero who created the Moon, stars and the universe. The Bear, at the base of the totem, is a close relative to mankind known to share both human and animal traits.

     

     

     

  • Where Air Meets Water (Eagle & Killerwhale) Plate [White Edition]

    Corrine Hunt

    $180.00 CAD

    Recycled Glass

    Plexi-glass stand not included.

    Plate may be hung on the wall – specific hole in the back included for this purpose.

    The concept for this design is based upon the physical depiction of air meeting water – a droplet of water which creates a swirl as the air affects its surface. The whorl-shape created by this abstract notion has produced the forms of an Eagle, on the left side of the design, and a Killerwhale; it’s body elusively curving around the right side. Corrine has continued to play with the whirlpool concept by introducing echoing shapes and forms that reflect across the surface of the material and invite the viewer to explore the “water’s” surface.

    White Edition Exclusive To Coastal Peoples Gallery

  • Where Air Meets Water (Eagle & Killerwhale) Plate [Black Edition]

    Corrine Hunt

    $70.00 CAD$110.00 CAD

    Recycled Glass

    Plexi-glass display stand not included.

    Plate may be hung on the wall – specific hole in the back included for this purpose.

    The concept for this design is based upon the physical depiction of air meeting water – a droplet of water which creates a swirl as the air affects its surface. The whorl-shape created by this abstract notion has produced the forms of an Eagle, on the left side of the design, and a Killerwhale; it’s body elusively curving around the right side. Corrine has continued to play with the whirlpool concept by introducing echoing shapes and forms that reflect across the surface of the material and invite the viewer to explore the “water’s” surface.

  • Haida Glass Totem

    Clarence Mills

    $255.00 CAD

    Glass, Etched and Sandblasted

    Created in the contemporary medium of glass, Clarence Mills’ Haida Totem is an interplay between tradition and innovation. This piece makes a strong visual statement with its structured Haida form line, and yet the translucent nature of the glass softens the composition. The totem blends ancient animal symbolism within a stylized contemporary form and demonstrates how innovative Clarence is with this medium.

    Available Crest Figures: Eagle, Raven, Bear & Human

  • Salmon Glass Panel

    Chester (Chaz) Patrick

    $3,900.00 CAD

    Glass, Red Cedar wood, Acrylic paint

     

    Every household and every clan possessed its own history and traditions in the form of myths and legends. Often describing how an individual had met a supernatural being, in animal form, who had given ownership of certain privileges. These privileges are a highly important part of First Nations life and are retained by particular family groups through their laws of inheritance. Privileges gave an individual status in the community and were more highly valued than any material possession.

    Salmon are honoured and celebrated by all coastal peoples: the fish serves as a powerful symbol of regeneration, self-sacrifice, and perseverance.

    Shortages of salmon are traditionally attributed to human disrespect and refusal to listen to and live by the wisdom of elders. The Pacific Northwest Coast peoples believed that salmon were actually people with eternal life who lived in a large house far under the ocean. In spring, they put on their salmon disguises and offered themselves to humans as food.

    The Nations believed that when entire fish skeletons were returned to the sea, the spirits would rise again and change into salmon people. In this way, the cycle could begin again the following year.

    Chaz’s beautifully etched glass Salmon Panel pays tribute to First Nation culture, oral history and traditions. These are testament to an ideology in which we are all interconnected and part of the greater whole – each related to and affecting one another.

     

  • Hands Shawl [Red, Turquoise or Charcoal]

    Dorothy Grant RCA

    $175.00 CAD

    50% Merino Wool 50% Silk

    We believe the hands are connected to the heart centre, which the Haida believe was the mind centre. The right and the left hands have human faces in the palms that represent creativity, healing and communication. Thus, the artist communicates their work through working with their hands.” – Dorothy Grant

  • Salmon Bentwood Box

    Joseph Campbell

    $1,075.00 CAD

    Red Cedar wood, Yellow Cedar wood, Acrylic paint

    Specific and unique to the Northwest Coast People is the bentwood or bent-corner box or container. A most outstanding item of the First Nations people, it is a made from one single plank of wood through a lengthy steaming process – a method strictly adapted by the coastal peoples.

  • Killerwhale Bentwood Box

    Joseph Campbell

    $490.00 CAD

    Red Cedar wood, Yellow Cedar wood, Acrylic paint

    The Killerwhale is a powerful underwater hunter and considered the sea manifestation of the land Wolf. It’s commonly known to mate and guard its family for a lifetime. Thus, a whale sighted near the shore, was believed to be a transformed human trying to communicate with his family.

    The Killerwhale is an important crest symbol, associated with family, power, strength, dignity and communication.

  • Salmon Bentwood Box

    Joseph Campbell

    $1,075.00 CAD

    Red Cedar wood, Yellow Cedar wood, Acrylic paint

    Specific and unique to the Northwest Coast People is the bentwood or bent-corner box or container. A most outstanding item of the First Nations people, it is a made from one single plank of wood through a lengthy steaming process – a method strictly adapted by the coastal peoples.

    Salmon are honoured and celebrated by all coastal peoples: the fish serves as a powerful symbol of regeneration, self-sacrifice and perseverance.

  • Salmon Bentwood Box

    Joseph Campbell

    $1,075.00 CAD

    Red Cedar wood, Yellow Cedar wood, Acrylic paint

    Specific and unique to the Northwest Coast People is the bentwood or bent-corner box or container. A most outstanding item of the First Nations people, it is a made from one single plank of wood through a lengthy steaming process – a method strictly adapted by the coastal peoples.

    Salmon are honoured and celebrated by all coastal peoples: the fish serves as a powerful symbol of regeneration, self-sacrifice and perseverance.

  • People Among the People: The Public Art of Susan Point

    Robert D. Watt

    $50.00 CAD

    Susan Point’s unique artworks have been credited with almost single-handedly reviving the traditional Coast Salish art style. Once nearly lost to the effect of colonization, the crescents, wedges, and human and animal forms characteristic of traditional Coast Salish art can now been seen around the world – reinvigorated with modern materials and techniques – in her serigraphs and public art installations, as well as the works of a new generation of artists that she’s inspired.

    While the images and symbolism of Point’s work are often informed by surviving traditional Salish works and the Traditional Knowledge of her Musqueam family and Elders, she has developed a unique and contemporary style that continues to evolve.

    People Among People beautifully displays the breadth and depth of her public art, from cast bronze faces in Whistler to massive carved cedar portals in Stanley Park to moulded polymer murals in Seattle.

    Through interviews and archival access, Robert D. Watt gathers the story of each piece, often in Point’s own words, to illustrate the vital role she has played in revealing the re-establishing the “Salish footprint” in the Pacific Northwest.  An artist’s statement by Point and an essay by Dr. Michael Kew complete this portrait of a profoundly moving collection of artworks.

    Hardcover

  • Eagle, Wolf & Raven Bentwood Box

    Wilf J. Sampson

    $6,600.00 CAD

    Red Cedar wood, Yellow Cedar wood, Operculum shell, Acrylic paint

    Specific and unique to the Northwest Coast People is the bentwood or bent-corner box or container. A most outstanding item of the First Nations people, it is a made from one single plank of wood through a lengthy steaming process – a method strictly adapted by the coastal peoples.

    The intelligent Eagle symbolizes status, power, peace and friendship, while the Raven is associated with Creation, Heroism, Transformation. The Wolf is a symbol of patience, individuality and protection.

  • Eagle Bentwood Box

    Joseph Campbell

    $1,250.00 CAD

    Red Cedar wood, Yellow cedar wood, Operculum shell, Acrylic paint

    Specific and unique to the Northwest Coast People is the bentwood or bent-corner box or container. A most outstanding item of the First Nations people, it is a made from one single plank of wood through a lengthy steaming process – a method strictly adapted by the coastal peoples.

    The intelligent Eagle symbolizes status, power, peace and friendship. The Eagle feather is considered a sacred part of many ceremonies and rituals.

  • Eagle & Bear Bentwood Box

    Wilf J. Sampson

    $6,200.00 CAD

    Red Cedar wood, Yellow Cedar wood, Acrylic paint

    Specific and unique to the Northwest Coast People is the bentwood or bent-corner box or container. A most outstanding item of the First Nations people, it is a made from one single plank of wood through a lengthy steaming process – a method strictly adapted by the coastal peoples.

    The intelligent Eagle symbolizes status, power, peace and friendship. The powerful, human-like Bear was referred to as ‘Elder Kinsmen’ and is associated with courage, strength, authority and learned humility.

  • Iinang Xaadee – K’a.ad (Dogfish) II [Framed]

    April White

    $520.00 CAD

    Serigraph, Edition of 55

    2016

    Framed

    “For my ancestors, the primary purpose of art is to unveil a parallel reality that is visible only in our minds—to share a glimpse of Supernatural Beings, with the world of Human Beings. Educated in science and with a spirit drawn to art, I see Earth as one great Being—with rock as a skeleton and running water as veins and arteries, great oceans as hearts—sustaining ecosystems. All as an interconnected biome—a web of life living, at least on the surface, symbiotically… as prey, and as predator.

    Iinang Xaadee—Herring People play a vital role in the ecosystem. They nurture, feed, give of themselves to keep beings alive in all realms— undersea, earth, and sky. When balance prevails, Herring People gather to dance in their great longhouse in such great numbers and with such vigour that the atmosphere overhead reverberates with their excitement. Now, Human Beings see Herring solely as a resource, blinded, not seeing their true value, only seeing monetary gain at the expense of the whole.” – April White

  • Iinang Xaadee – Guud (Eagle) II [Framed]

    April White

    $520.00 CAD

    Serigraph, Edition of 55

    2016

    Framed

    “For my ancestors, the primary purpose of art is to unveil a parallel reality that is visible only in our minds—to share a glimpse of Supernatural Beings, with the world of Human Beings. Educated in science and with a spirit drawn to art, I see Earth as one great Being—with rock as a skeleton and running water as veins and arteries, great oceans as hearts—sustaining ecosystems. All as an interconnected biome—a web of life living, at least on the surface, symbiotically… as prey, and as predator.

    Iinang Xaadee—Herring People play a vital role in the ecosystem. They nurture, feed, give of themselves to keep beings alive in all realms— undersea, earth, and sky. When balance prevails, Herring People gather to dance in their great longhouse in such great numbers and with such vigour that the atmosphere overhead reverberates with their excitement. Now, Human Beings see Herring solely as a resource, blinded, not seeing their true value, only seeing monetary gain at the expense of the whole.” – April White

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