Glasswork

GLASS as a contemporary medium in First Nations art creates a light, illuminating visual statement while utilizing traditional formlines. Its translucent nature softens the composition, clearly redefining the progression of this ancient artform.

  • Salmon Sculpture

    Chester (Chaz) Patrick

    CA$980.00

    Exclusive to Coastal Peoples Fine Arts Gallery

    Glass; etched and sandblasted (Glass thickness 12mm)

    Maple wood base

    Salmon are honoured and celebrated by all coastal peoples: the fish serves as a powerful symbol of regeneration, self-sacrifice and perseverance.

    Shortages of Salmon are traditionally attributed to human disrespect and refusal to listen to and live by the wisdom of elders. The Pacific Northwest Coast peoples believed that Salmon were actually people with eternal life who lived in a large house far under the ocean. In spring, they put on their Salmon disguises and offered themselves to humans as food.

  • Humpback Whale & Thunderbird Glass Panel

    Moy Sutherland

    RESERVED

    Also available upon special order – individually custom-made

    Glass, sandblasted

    Red Cedar wood, Stainless steel, Acrylic paint

    Limited-edition of 11

     

  • Thunderbird & Salmon Panel

    Moy Sutherland

    SOLD

    Available upon special order – individually custom-made

    Glass, sandblasted

    Red Cedar wood, Stainless steel, Acrylic paint

    Limited-edition of 11

    With a traditional formline design etched into the contemporary medium of glass, Moy Sutherland’s Thunderbird & Salmon Panel constitutes an elegant example of coastal First Nations’ artwork in the modern era.

    While panels are a common feature of Pacific Northwest Coast art, they are primarily carved from laminated planks of cedar wood. Glasswork panels are still quite rare, but truly attest to the evolution of contemporary coastal art over the last decade. This particular panel is a lovely illustration of the interplay between tradition and innovation that can be found in many Northwest Coast artworks of today.

  • Raven Panel

    Moy Sutherland

    SOLD

    Available upon special order – individually custom-made

    Glass, Sandblasted

    Red Cedar wood, Stainless steel, Acrylic paint

    Limited-Edition of 11

    With a traditional formline design etched into the contemporary medium of glass, Moy Sutherland’s Raven Panel constitutes an elegant example of coastal First Nations’ artwork in the modern era.

    While panels are a common feature of Pacific Northwest Coast art, they are primarily carved from laminated planks of cedar wood. Glasswork panels are still quite rare, but truly attest to the evolution of contemporary coastal art over the last decade. This particular panel is a lovely illustration of the interplay between tradition and innovation that can be found in many Northwest Coast artworks of today.

  • Salmon Panel

    Moy Sutherland

    SOLD

    Available upon special order – individually custom-made

    Glass, sandblasted

    Red Cedar wood, Stainless steel, Acrylic paint

    Limited-edition of 11

    With a traditional formline design etched into the contemporary medium of glass, Moy Sutherland’s Salmon Panel constitutes an elegant example of coastal First Nations’ artwork in the modern era.

    While panels are a common feature of Pacific Northwest Coast art, they are primarily carved from laminated planks of cedar wood. Glasswork panels are still quite rare, but truly attest to the evolution of contemporary coastal art over the last decade. This particular panel is a lovely illustration of the interplay between tradition and innovation that can be found in many Northwest Coast artworks of today.

  • Eagle’s Play Glass Rattle

    Susan Point RCA

    Price upon request

    Hand blown glass, Red Cedar wood base

    This beautiful contemporary rattle is made with hand-blown glass, an example of Susan Point’s balance between traditional and contemporary styles. It demonstrates her ability to diversify, yet reveals her respect for tradition and ancient mythology. Based on an ancient implement, a spindle whorl was used for spinning wool into yarn for the process of creating fine woolen blankets.⁠

  • Haida Eagle Pole

    Geoff Greene

    CA$3,600.00

    Glass, Etched and Sandblasted, 20K Gold Leaf, Edition of 57

    Glass thickness 12mm

    Exclusive to Coastal Peoples Fine Arts Gallery – currently available by custom order only – please ask us for details

    Geoff Greene’s Haida Eagle Totem pays tribute to an important symbol and crest figure to the Haida nation. Created in the contemporary medium of glass, the Haida Eagle Totem celebrates traditional design within a luminous setting that speaks to the evolution of the classic Haida form.

    The Eagle is respected for its intelligence and power as well as its vision both figurative and literal; it claims both honor and a high stature. The Eagle Clan is traditionally the most prominent family and the Eagle Chief the most powerful chief. Although revered as a powerful hunter, the Eagle’s feathers are considered sacred. Traditionally, Shamans believed that Eagle feathers possessed healing powers and thus used them in various ceremonial and ritual contexts; today these feathers are still strewn to welcome an honored guest.

    Geoff Greene’s beautifully etched and sandblasted Haida Eagle Totem employs the magnificent translucent nature of glass in its finish along with the accent of gold leaf to provide additional depth and interest within this unique work. Masterly created, this piece blends ancient animal symbolism within a stylized contemporary form and demonstrates how many artists are setting themselves apart through their unique concepts.

    Available with Stainless steel or Natural Maple wood base.

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