Bowls

  • Killerwhale & Hawk Bentwood Bowl

    Don Yeomans

    CA$20,500.00

    Yellow Cedar wood (bent & bulged), Operculum shell, Acrylic paint

    These steam-bent boxes are a lot of fun to do. The boards being extra thick lend themselves well to very sculptural carving. I chose to do a Killerwhale nearly twenty years ago, when I first got this box from my late friend, Larry Rosso. The paint and operculum shell inlay evolved to counteract the strong wood grain that wanted to be the star.” – Don Yeomans

  • Butterfly Bowl

    Jim Charlie

    CA$4,100.00

    Red Cedar wood, Yellow Cedar wood

    Butterfly is a minor crest figure and often appears simply as decoration; however, it has become increasingly popular in contemporary First Nations design.

  • Ancestor Feast Dish

    Sean Whonnock

    CA$1,900.00

    Yellow Cedar wood, Abalone shell, Acrylic paint

    Sean has consistently produced carvings and paintings since 1990 and is constantly updating his own unique style. His passion is fueled by the Kwakwaka’wakw culture and his work has become valued by collectors, galleries and museums.

    A ceremonial dish, also known as a feast dish or potlatch dish, was a treasured heirloom which families brought out for great feasts as a gesture of hospitality and welcoming. Presently, many ceremonial dishes are carved in miniature form, meant for collectors who appreciate the historic and symbolic value behind each artwork. This aspect of the art is considered to be a contemporary turn that northwest coast native art has taken throughout the years.

  • Seal Bowl

    Shawn Karpes

    CA$1,650.00

    Red Cedar wood, Abalone shell

    A ceremonial dish, also known as a feast dish or potlatch dish, was a treasured heirloom which families brought out for great feasts as a gesture of hospitality and welcoming. Presently, many ceremonial dishes are carved in miniature form, meant for collectors who appreciate the historic and symbolic value behind each artwork. This aspect of the art is considered to be a contemporary turn that northwest coast native art has taken throughout the years.

  • Eagle Feast Dish

    Garner Moody

    CA$9,200.00

    Yellow Cedar wood

    A ceremonial dish, also known as a feast dish or potlatch dish, was a treasured heirloom which families brought out for great feasts as a gesture of hospitality and welcoming. Presently, many ceremonial dishes are carved in miniature form, meant for collectors who appreciate the historic and symbolic value behind each artwork. This aspect of the art is considered to be a contemporary turn that northwest coast native art has taken throughout the years.

    Garner began carving at the early age of nine and, by age fifteen, he was carving his first piece of argillite. After moving to Vancouver in 1987, he spent the next two years working with renowned Haida artist Bill Reid on his Lootaas canoe and alongside a host of accomplished carvers such as Alfred Collinson, Rufus Moody, Giitsxaa, Nelson Cross, and Ding (Melvin) Hutchingson. Moody works in various mediums including cedar, gold, argillite and paper – all exemplifying his exquisite attention to detail and extraordinary artistic skills.

     

  • Beaver & Eagle Fish Bowl

    Derek J. White

    CA$8,000.00

    Sterling Silver; Repousse, Engraved

    Derek White’s extraordinary Beaver & Eagle Fish Bowl, created in the traditional Haida form and utilizing the ancient technique of repousse to add dimension, demonstrates his articulate master carving and artistry skills. Containers such as bowls were traditionally created out of Cedar or Alder wood and utilized in daily life. The chosen medium of silver serves as a contemporary progression of this ancient art form while illustrating the intricate foundational links which combine cultural heritage with the arts.

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