• Raven Panel

    Moy Sutherland

    $6,600.00 CAD

    Glass, sandblasted

    Red Cedar wood, Acrylic paint

    With a traditional formline design etched into the contemporary medium of glass, Moy Sutherland’s Raven Panel constitutes an elegant example of coastal First Nations’ artwork in the modern era.

    While panels are a common feature of Pacific Northwest Coast art, they are primary carved from laminated planks of cedar wood. Glasswork panels are still quite rare, but truly attest to the evolution of contemporary coastal art over the last decade. This particular panel is a lovely illustration of the interplay between tradition and innovation that can be found in many Northwest Coast artworks of today.

  • Salmon Glass Panel

    Chester (Chaz) Patrick

    $3,900.00 CAD

    Glass, Red Cedar wood, Acrylic paint

     

    Every household and every clan possessed its own history and traditions in the form of myths and legends. Often describing how an individual had met a supernatural being, in animal form, who had given ownership of certain privileges. These privileges are a highly important part of First Nations life and are retained by particular family groups through their laws of inheritance. Privileges gave an individual status in the community and were more highly valued than any material possession.

    Salmon are honoured and celebrated by all coastal peoples: the fish serves as a powerful symbol of regeneration, self-sacrifice, and perseverance.

    Shortages of salmon are traditionally attributed to human disrespect and refusal to listen to and live by the wisdom of elders. The Pacific Northwest Coast peoples believed that salmon were actually people with eternal life who lived in a large house far under the ocean. In spring, they put on their salmon disguises and offered themselves to humans as food.

    The Nations believed that when entire fish skeletons were returned to the sea, the spirits would rise again and change into salmon people. In this way, the cycle could begin again the following year.

    Chaz’s beautifully etched glass Salmon Panel pays tribute to First Nation culture, oral history and traditions. These are testament to an ideology in which we are all interconnected and part of the greater whole – each related to and affecting one another.

     

  • Olaka Ikux de Nala (It’s a Really Good Day) 2010-20 Panel

    Corrine Hunt

    $1,840.00 CAD

    Wood, Acrylic paint

    2010-2020 Commemorative Collection

    The design elements and colours of gold, silver and bronze (copper) are representative of the Olympic medals.

  • Eagle Panel

    Moy Sutherland

    $12,500.00 CAD

    Red Cedar wood, Abalone shell, Acrylic paint

    Moy Sutherland’s Eagle Panel constitutes a captivating depiction of a powerful Pacific Northwest Coast figure. By utilizing the full surface of the panel, Moy manages to display the Eagle figure in its entirety, and allows for an extraordinary level of detail throughout the piece. Combined with a unique shade of green and generous use of brilliant Abalone inlay, the final result is a remarkably striking work of art.

    The Eagle is seen as a symbol of prestige, power, peace, wisdom and friendship. Eagles are one of the most prominent beings in the art and mythology of Pacific Northwest Coast Indigenous culture, and claim both honour and high stature. They are respected for their intelligence, grace, and power, and can be associated with freedom and lofty pursuits. In artwork, this creature can be easily recognized by its hooked beak.

    Moy has learned his craft from both Kwakwaka’wakw and Nuu-chah-nulth artists, and has used this experience to broaden his understanding of all Pacific Northwest Coast First Nations’ art forms. Although he is very mindful of staying within the traditional rules and values of his culture, he strives to find ways to set himself apart from other artists. He enjoys exploring different media and he is refining his own unique style, both with modern and traditional techniques. For Moy, his art is very deeply rooted in his culture. He finds it both spiritually rewarding and educational.

  • Wolf of the Sea Panel

    Moy Sutherland

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Abalone shell, Acrylic paint

    Moy Sutherland’s “Wolf of the Sea” Panel is a striking depiction of a powerful Pacific Northwest Coast figure. The size of the panel allows the full figure to pan down the face of the wood, inviting the eyes of all in its vicinity. Combined with a generous use of Abalone inlay, the final result is a truly impressive work of art.

    The Wolf is seen as a symbol of patience, individuality, provider, unity, and family. Out of all the animals, Wolves are believed to have the strongest supernatural powers and are often sought as spirit aids by hunters. Wolves are the counterpart to the Killerwhale. They are fierce protectors of family and are known to mate for a lifetime.

    The Killerwhale, often referred to as the “Wolf of the Sea,” is associated with family, power, strength, dignity and communication. Like the Wolf, Killerwhales are fierce protectors and mate for a lifetime. According to coastal First Nations oral traditions, Killerwhales live in villages deep within the ocean, where they remove their skins and live as large humans. They are said to be the reincarnations of great chiefs, and are reputed to act as guides to humans caught within storms.

  • Humpback Whale Panel

    Moy Sutherland

    $8,000.00 CAD

    Red Cedar wood

    Deviating from the opulence that typically characterizes his work, Moy Sutherland’s Humpback Whale Panel utilizes a more minimalist artistic approach which highlights the richness of red cedar wood.

    Cedar wood is the most traditionally used medium in Pacific Northwest Coast art, and often the artists’ diligently carved designs are highlighted with colourful paint. Cedar is strong, lightweight, and extremely versatile. These qualities lend themselves well to carving, and result in a wood that can be used to create a wide variety of objects. Although painted panels are beautiful in their own right, they tend to distract from the natural beauty of the medium itself. In contrast, the elegant simplicity of this Humpback Whale Panel allows this natural beauty to take centre stage.

    Historically, whaling was an important subsistence practice for the Nuu-cha-nulth people, and played a pervasive role in their social and economic systems. Alongside the California grey whale, Humpback whales were one of the species most commonly hunted by Indigenous communities in the region. While Humpback whales are not often depicted in Pacific Northwest Coast art, Grey and Humpback whales, as well as other imagery related to whaling, play a significant role in the artistic traditions of the Nuu-chah-nulth.

    Moy Sutherland has learned his craft from both Kwakwaka’wakw and Nuu-chah-nulth artists, and has used this experience to broaden his understanding of all Pacific Northwest Coast First Nations’ art forms. Although he is very mindful of staying within the traditional rules and values of his culture, he strives to find ways to set himself apart from other artists. He enjoys exploring different media and he is refining his own unique style, both with modern and traditional techniques. For Moy, his art is very deeply rooted in his culture. He finds it both spiritually rewarding and educational.

  • Orca Pod Panel

    David Neel

    $11,000.00 CAD

    Yellow Cedar wood

    The Killerwhale, sometimes called the Orca, is an important crest symbol, associated with family, power, strength, dignity and communication. In Pacific Northwest Coast Indigenous culture, every clan possesses its own history and traditions in the form of myths and legends. These legends explain how the ancestors of each clan acquired ownership of certain privileges, often gifted to them during an encounter with a powerful supernatural being. These privileges are a highly important part of First Nations life, and are retained by particular family groups through their laws of inheritance.

    Mating once for life and thought to be the reincarnation of great chiefs, Killerwhales are considered to be the protectors of mankind. Although they are known to capsize canoes and drag the inhabitants to their deep-sea dwellings, they are also reputed to act as guides to humans caught within storms.

    According to ancient oral traditions, Killerwhale Clans live in Killerwhale Villages deep within the ocean. When at home, they remove their outer skins and live as large humans. This legend serves as David Neel’s inspiration for the Orca Pod Panel.

    Orca Pod Panel is inspired by the family group, the pod, that is the social order for Killerwhales throughout their lives. They are known for being highly intelligent animals and are a prominent crest animal among all the Northwest coast Indigenous peoples. It is one of the main crests of my family. In our ancient stories there is a village under the sea, almost like another dimension or realm, where orcas transform from and to human form.” ~ David Neel, 2019

  • The Marriage of Raven & Frog Panel

    Moy Sutherland

    $17,000.00 CAD

    Red Cedar wood, Abalone shell, Acrylic paint

    According to ancient Nuu-chah-nulth oral traditions, Raven has married every character in the spiritual pantheon of the Pacific Northwest Coast. However, in each marriage, the union was never consummated. The marriage of Raven and Frog is no exception.

    Once the wedding was over, Raven asked his wife, Frog, to come join him in bed. Frog told him that she would join him after she had gone outside to sing for a bit. However, while Frog was singing, Raven ended up falling asleep. The same thing happened the next night, and every night that followed. Thus, as with the rest of his marriages, Raven was never able to consummate his marriage with Frog.

  • Salmon Plaque

    Kevin Daniel Cranmer

    Price upon request

    Red Cedar wood, Abalone shell, Copper, Acrylic paint

    2015

  • “Rockin’ it” Panel

    Corrine Hunt

    $2,400.00 CAD

    Reclaimed Red Cedar wood, Abalone shell, Copper & Silver nails, Acrylic paint

  • Eagle Panel

    Moy Sutherland

    $13,200.00 CAD

    Red Cedar wood, Abalone shell, Acrylic paint

    Moy Sutherland’s Eagle Panel constitutes a superb rendering of a powerful Pacific Northwest Coast figure. His tasteful use of brightly coloured Abalone inlay accentuates the panel’s bold formlines, culminating in another beautiful work of art by Sutherland.

    The Eagle is seen as a symbol of prestige, power, peace, wisdom and friendship. Eagles are one of the most prominent beings in the art and mythology of Pacific Northwest Coast Indigenous culture, and claim both honour and high stature. They are respected for their intelligence, grace, and power, and can be associated with freedom and lofty pursuits. In artwork, the figure can be easily recognized by its hooked beak.

    Moy has learned his craft from both Kwakwaka’wakw and Nuu-chah-nulth artists, and has used this experience to broaden his understanding of all Pacific Northwest Coast First Nations’ art forms. Although he is very mindful of staying within the traditional rules and values of his culture, he strives to find ways to set himself apart from other artists. He enjoys exploring different media and he is refining his own unique style, both with modern and traditional techniques. For Moy, his art is very deeply rooted in his culture. He finds it both spiritually rewarding and educational.

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