Textiles

First Nations have been creating intricate textiles and weavings for hundreds of years. Today, artists experiment in new materials with evolving traditional or contemporary designs. In our collection, we offer a selection of some of the very best.

  • Eagles with Salmon Toilet Paper Dispenser

    Trace Yeomans

    CA$7,000.00

    Ultrasuede, Douglas Fir wood, Yellow Cedar wood, Acrylic paint

    25.5 x 6 x 11.25″ (rolled, including stand)

    144 x 4″ (unfurled, without stand)

    This was a piece that came to mind during the ‘toilet paper panic’ during the early stages of this pandemic. I thought it was peculiar that people were lined up and panicked about buying toilet paper, sanitizer, and masks rather than food and water. I wanted to create a modern looking, free standing art piece that – like the masks I created – would be emblematic of the times we are in, but would also hold the traditional aspects of my culture…I felt that this piece would be something that the whole world could relate to and understand, even if they know nothing about Haida art.” – Trace Yeomans

  • Raven’s Tail Chilkat Miniature Apron / Mask

    Trace Yeomans

    CA$2,500.00

    Ultrasuede, String

    7 x 8.5″ (mask only)

    14 x 14 x 4.25 (with display case)

    I wanted to create a piece that was emblematic of this time. Something [that was] meaningful to me and that would represent my culture. I wanted to keep the traditional aspect intact, so I made the mask resemble a miniature dance apron. Although these masks are strictly decorative, I have added ties so they can be put on the face for photos to represent that they are masks.” – Trace Yeomans

  • Deconstructed Frog [Framed]

    Trace Yeomans

    CA$4,200.00

    Ultrasuede appliqué on individual Canvas boards, Set of 4

    2019

    Framed

    17.75 x 17.75 x 2″ (each panel)

  • Hecate Strait Scarf – State II

    Susan Point RCA

    CA$420.00

    100% Silk; Limited Edition of 100

    Exclusively available through Coastal Peoples Gallery

    “Hecate Strait is a wide but shallow strait between Haida Gwaii (formerly known as the Queen Charlotte Islands) and the mainland of British Columbia.  Hecate Strait, because it is so shallow, is especially susceptible to violent storms and weather; therefore, has always been revered by the Northwest Coast First Nations Peoples.

    The shallow waters make it an abundant place for marine life, especially for spotting Orcas and Humpback Whales breaching.

    In this scarf design, I’ve illustrated the turbulent waters, abundance of Orcas, and Salmon.

    Orcas are great guardians of the ocean, with Seals as slaves and Dolphins as warriors.  Orcas are closely related to humans; I was told many legends as a child of the whale people and their villages beneath the sea.

    Salmon are a symbol of abundance, wealth and prosperity because Salmon are the primary food source for the people of the Northwest Coast.  It is also symbolic of dependability and renewal representing the provider of life.  Salmon in pairs are good luck.”

    – Susan Point, 2018

  • Hecate Strait Scarf – State I

    Susan Point RCA

    CA$420.00

    100% Silk; Limited Edition of 100

    Exclusively available through Coastal Peoples Gallery

    “Hecate Strait is a wide but shallow strait between Haida Gwaii (formerly known as the Queen Charlotte Islands) and the mainland of British Columbia.  Hecate Strait, because it is so shallow, is especially susceptible to violent storms and weather; therefore, has always been revered by the Northwest Coast First Nations Peoples.

    The shallow waters make it an abundant place for marine life, especially for spotting Orcas and Humpback Whales breaching.

    In this scarf design, I’ve illustrated the turbulent waters, abundance of Orcas, and Salmon.

    Orcas are great guardians of the ocean, with Seals as slaves and Dolphins as warriors.  Orcas are closely related to humans; I was told many legends as a child of the whale people and their villages beneath the sea.

    Salmon are a symbol of abundance, wealth and prosperity because Salmon are the primary food source for the people of the Northwest Coast.  It is also symbolic of dependability and renewal representing the provider of life.  Salmon in pairs are good luck.”

    – Susan Point, 2018

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