Wood Shaman Panel by Northwest Coast Native Artist Eugene Alfred

Shaman Panel

Availability: Only 1 available

Yellow Cedar wood, Acrylic paint

Eugene Alfred’s stunning Shaman Panel is a masterfully carved and finely painted work of art, depicting a mysterious Shaman wrapped up in a bright cloak. The cloak is designed to look like a Raven, and is accompanied by a matching Raven frontlet.

Shamans were typically a chief of the village or a person of high-ranking stature who followed the directions given by their spirit helper. After a Shaman’s initial encounter with their helper, the spirit would turn into foam and disappear, uttering a word just before they left. This word would become the name the Shaman would use when asked to cure someone.

Prior to their disappearance, spirit helpers often left behind a physical object relating to their presence. These objects served as tokens of the encounters, and were considered to be great treasures. In addition to these treasures, Shamans would wear cedar bark ornamentation and face paint, and often utilized ceremonial objects such as rattles while performing their ritualistic songs and dances. These objects served as tokens of the encounters. This paraphernalia would enhance the spiritual presence in order to bring about supernatural powers of healing.

28 x 13 x 1.25"

$5,400.00 CAD

Only 1 available

Reserve this artwork
  • Description
  • Additional Information
  • Artist Bio

Yellow Cedar wood, Acrylic paint

Eugene Alfred’s stunning Shaman Panel is a masterfully carved and finely painted work of art, depicting a mysterious Shaman wrapped up in a bright cloak. The cloak is designed to look like a Raven, and is accompanied by a matching Raven frontlet.

Shamans were typically a chief of the village or a person of high-ranking stature who followed the directions given by their spirit helper. After a Shaman’s initial encounter with their helper, the spirit would turn into foam and disappear, uttering a word just before they left. This word would become the name the Shaman would use when asked to cure someone.

Prior to their disappearance, spirit helpers often left behind a physical object relating to their presence. These objects served as tokens of the encounters, and were considered to be great treasures. In addition to these treasures, Shamans would wear cedar bark ornamentation and face paint, and often utilized ceremonial objects such as rattles while performing their ritualistic songs and dances. These objects served as tokens of the encounters. This paraphernalia would enhance the spiritual presence in order to bring about supernatural powers of healing.

The message will be closed after 20 s
Ajax Loading