Where Air Meets Water: The Eagle and the Orca

Availability: Only 1 available

Bone ash, graphite and aluminum composite

In this panel design Corrine Hunt has propelled her use of the medium in such a way that she invites a ‘contemporary’ perception of form. The panel is made from a composite of bone ash, graphite, and aluminum; the organic black colour coming from the ash. The panel itself has been cut from a technically controlled machine, and then has been hand-finished and polished to a luminous sheen.

Corrine's concept for the panel is based upon the physical depiction of air meeting water; a drop of water which creates a swirl as the air affects its surface. The whorl-shape created by this abstract notion has produced the forms of an Eagle, on the upper left side of the panel, and an Orca; it’s body elusively curving around the right side of the panel. Corrine has continued to play with the whirlpool concept by introducing echoing shapes and forms that reflect across the surface of the panel and invite the viewer to explore the “water’s” surface.

In First Nations art and culture, the Eagle is seen as the symbol of status, power, peace, and friendship, whilst the Killerwhale is revered for its powerful hunting ability and is considered to be the sea manifestation of the Wolf. Both in legend and in the wild, the Killerwhale guards its family for a lifetime. Again, the artist is working around the model of “Air meeting Water”, both visually and in her choice of crest figures.

The artist's intention in her design is to mesmerize the viewer; she combines traditional formlines of the Northwest Coast with the interpretive concepts of post modernism, allowing the eye to move seamlessly and always see something new.

35.25 x 35.25 x 1"

$18,000.00 CAD

Only 1 available

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Bone ash, graphite and aluminum composite

In this panel design Corrine Hunt has propelled her use of the medium in such a way that she invites a ‘contemporary’ perception of form. The panel is made from a composite of bone ash, graphite, and aluminum; the organic black colour coming from the ash. The panel itself has been cut from a technically controlled machine, and then has been hand-finished and polished to a luminous sheen.

Corrine’s concept for the panel is based upon the physical depiction of air meeting water; a drop of water which creates a swirl as the air affects its surface. The whorl-shape created by this abstract notion has produced the forms of an Eagle, on the upper left side of the panel, and an Orca; it’s body elusively curving around the right side of the panel. Corrine has continued to play with the whirlpool concept by introducing echoing shapes and forms that reflect across the surface of the panel and invite the viewer to explore the “water’s” surface.

In First Nations art and culture, the Eagle is seen as the symbol of status, power, peace, and friendship, whilst the Killerwhale is revered for its powerful hunting ability and is considered to be the sea manifestation of the Wolf. Both in legend and in the wild, the Killerwhale guards its family for a lifetime. Again, the artist is working around the model of “Air meeting Water”, both visually and in her choice of crest figures.

The artist’s intention in her design is to mesmerize the viewer; she combines traditional formlines of the Northwest Coast with the interpretive concepts of post modernism, allowing the eye to move seamlessly and always see something new.

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